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Hot Rod Lima - B&M P4 Pacific

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    Hot Rod Lima - B&M P4 Pacific

    Hi Folks,

    Just another build thread:





    Probably one of the most modern Pacific's ever made.


    In 1934, the Boston and Maine Railroad contracted with Lima for construction of five locomotives of the 4-6-2 Pacific type, to be numbered in the series 3710 through 3714. Lima delivered these locomotives in December 1934. These first five Lima engines, which the Boston and Maine classified as their P-4-a type, worked so well that the company ordered another five from Lima in 1936. These, delivered in March 1937, proved to be the last Pacifics that Lima would ever build. The last five Pacifics acquired by the Boston and Maine varied slightly from the earlier ones and became the P-4-b class, Nos. 3715 through 3719.

    Locomotive No. 3713 is, of course, one of that first group of Lima Pacifics, a P-4-a that cost the company $100,000. She was inspected by C. W. Bruening at the Lima plant on December 21, 1934. As originally delivered, the locomotive had a metal shroud concealing her sand and steam domes and had smoke deflectors alongside the smokebox (some varieties of which were colloquially referred to as “elephant ears”), and a single, deck-mounted air pump on the pilot deck. As thus delivered, the engine had a semi-streamlined appearance.

    Locomotive No. 3713 and her sisters went into service hauling the most important passenger trains on the Boston & Maine, eventually serving between Boston, Massachusetts, and Bangor, Maine; between White River Junction and Troy, New York; between Worcester, Massachusetts, and Portland, Maine; and between Springfield, Massachusetts, and White River Junction, Vermont. She was designed to operate at a normal speed of 70 miles per hour. She carried sufficient coal to pull and heat a 14-car train about 250 miles, and enough water to last about 125 miles.

    When the Boston and Maine took delivery of its second order of Lima Pacifics in 1937, it sponsored a contest among New England schoolchildren to name those 10 engines and 10 other passenger engines. The contest was open to any pupil in any community along the railroad and included students from kindergarten to the final year of junior high school. The railroad promised to paint the names on the sides of the locomotive and to attach to the locomotive a plate with the name of the boy or girl who suggested the name, as well as the name of his or her school. The contest elicited more than 10,000 names for the 20 engines.

    A 14-year-old named J. Schumann Moore of Lynn, Massachusetts, a student at Lynn’s Eastern High School, suggested the winning name for No. 3713: The Constitution. Other winning names for the 10 Lima Pacifics were for No. 3710, Peter Cooper No. 3711, Allagash; No. 3712, East Wind; No. 3714, Greylock, No. 3715, Kwasind; No. 3716, Rogers’ Rangers; No. 3717, Old North Bridge; No. 3718, Ye Salem Witch; and No. 3719, Camel’s Hump.

    Certainly "The Constitution" was among the more dignified names. Moore said he selected the name because it signified “the backbone of our country. Appropriate especially in that the railroads are the backbone of our transportation system.” On December 11, 1937, the railroad held a christening ceremony in Boston’s North Station. The railroad would hold two more such contests, one in 1940 and one in 1941, to name eight additional engines. For all 31 named engines, the engine name and the name of the contest winner were inscribed on a pair of large name plates mounted on the running boards on both sides of each engine above the drive wheels. Thus engine No. 3713 and her sisters acquired names, a practice more typical of the 19th than the 20th century in railroad operation.

    After the country entered World War II in 1941, No. 3713 pulled many a 15- to 20-car troop train during the next four years. It was apparently during these wartime years that, for reasons unknown at present, the Boston and Maine removed both the shroud atop the boiler of these five locomotives, and the smoke deflectors alongside the smokeboxes. They may simply have been removed for routine servicing and, in the press of wartime conditions, were left off to avoid the time and labor of putting them back. About 1944 or 1945, the company added a second air pump on the pilot deck.

    It was probably after the war that No. 3713 and her sisters were repainted and relettered in a racy style sometimes referred to as “speed” lettering because its slanted script gave an impression of speed. The “speed” lettering replaced the standard rectangular herald adopted by the Boston & Maine in 1927.

    Following the war, No. 3713 and her sisters returned to handling the regular passenger traffic. Among their patrons were young campers headed for an outing in the northern woods. Toward the end of her working life, No. 3713 was equipped with special steam pipes and used to melt snow in the yards of North Station, and still later as a stationary steam power plant. She was last called into service during a flood. Whereas floods shorted out the axle-mounted traction motors of diesel-electric locomotives, the fireboxes of many steam locomotives rode high enough to be above flood waters so that steam locomotives could push through flood waters that diesels dared not enter. No. 3713 made her last run in 1956.

    Work In Progress
    bm462rend by Scott B, on Flickr


    Regards,
    Scott
    <a href=https://www.trainsim.com/forums/filedata/fetch?filedataid=80663&type=full title=thumb_80663.png >thumb_80663.png</a>​ My Blender Models

    #2
    Hi Folks,

    One more for good measure.


    bm462rend_S by Scott B, on Flickr


    Regards,
    Scott
    <a href=https://www.trainsim.com/forums/filedata/fetch?filedataid=80663&type=full title=thumb_80663.png >thumb_80663.png</a>​ My Blender Models

    Comment


      #3
      While I wasn't a big fan of the B&M, I must say, you are hitting these steamers out of the ball park.

      I'm hoping some day you'll tackle the MEC steamers too. :P
      Fantastic work!
      -Shawn K-
      Derby Rail Shops

      Comment


        #4
        I concur, fantastic work.

        Cheers,

        Marek.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by CSRX View Post
          While I wasn't a big fan of the B&M, I must say, you are hitting these steamers out of the ball park.

          I'm hoping some day you'll tackle the MEC steamers too. :P
          Fantastic work!
          Hi Shawn,

          MEC - other than the war power - just USRA Pacs and Mikes for the most part - right?

          I like Maine - in fact - I plan to be a resident in the not-too-distant future - near the "Bold Coast" (Downeast). I can't wait.

          Knowing myself - I need good routes to inspire the effort. I've been dying to do a NYC Mohawk but no real route to run it on.

          Thanks - I'm really digg'n this Blender thing - the transition only took about 3 weeks to move from 3DC - far less than I expected. While I've only scratched the surface of what Blender is capable of - I think I've already gleaned enough knowledge to fully complete this model (thanks to all the help on Elvas). Most - but not all - things are far easier in Blender than they ever were in 3DC.

          Regards,
          Scott
          Last edited by scottb613; 01-12-2023, 12:04 PM.
          <a href=https://www.trainsim.com/forums/filedata/fetch?filedataid=80663&type=full title=thumb_80663.png >thumb_80663.png</a>​ My Blender Models

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by superheatedsteam View Post
            I concur, fantastic work.

            Cheers,

            Marek.
            Hi Marek,

            Thanks - you sure helped me get started with Blender.

            I did wind up animating the "piston/crosshead" by eye and it did come out silky smooth - I can't detect any imperfections - and I'm looking for them.

            Yeah - this model - I decided I wasn't going to let poly count hold me back - things like the hatch on top of the smokebox - that I would normally paint are now fully 3D along with the latches. While still being prudent - I'd estimate somewhere around 35K for loco by the time I'm done.

            Regards,
            Scott
            <a href=https://www.trainsim.com/forums/filedata/fetch?filedataid=80663&type=full title=thumb_80663.png >thumb_80663.png</a>​ My Blender Models

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by scottb613 View Post
              Hi Shawn,

              MEC - other than the war power - just USRA Pacs and Mikes for the most part - right?

              I like Maine - in fact - I plan to be a resident in the not-too-distant future - near the "Bold Coast" (Downeast). I can't wait.

              Knowing myself - I need good routes to inspire the effort. I've been dying to do a NYC Mohawk but no real route to run it on.

              Thanks - I'm really digg'n this Blender thing - the transition only took about 3 weeks to move from 3DC - far less than I expected. While I've only scratched the surface of what Blender is capable of - I think I've already gleaned enough knowledge to fully complete this model (thanks to all the help on Elvas). Most - but not all - things are far easier in Blender than they ever were in 3DC.

              Regards,
              Scott
              If you ever make it to the Bangor/Brewer location, let me know. I work the territory between Brownville Jct, ME and McAdam, NB. I can inform you on some really good eats in the area.

              I'm not so sure on what MEC truly had, I have a book that discusses every single MEC steam locomotive from the very start to the final purchase before the diesel era started. If I find it in my storage in the spare room, I can definitely let you know.

              I've been meaning to download the latest blender and try my hands at it, mainly for buildings and such for my routes.
              The McAdam station will be one that will be tough, as well as the Portland, ME Union Station.
              -Shawn K-
              Derby Rail Shops

              Comment


                #8
                Fantastic work.

                There were a number of examples of Pacifics being shrouded partially or fully... The CNW and MILW's are favorites of mine.
                If you like what you see here at Trainsim.com, be it the discussions and knowledge in the forums, items saved in our library or the ongoing development of our TSRE Fork, I hope you'll consider a paid membership to help support keeping the site operating.... Thanks!

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by CSRX View Post
                  If you ever make it to the Bangor/Brewer location, let me know. I work the territory between Brownville Jct, ME and McAdam, NB. I can inform you on some really good eats in the area.

                  I'm not so sure on what MEC truly had, I have a book that discusses every single MEC steam locomotive from the very start to the final purchase before the diesel era started. If I find it in my storage in the spare room, I can definitely let you know.

                  I've been meaning to download the latest blender and try my hands at it, mainly for buildings and such for my routes.
                  The McAdam station will be one that will be tough, as well as the Portland, ME Union Station.
                  Hi Shawn,

                  Hah - will do - I'm always going through Bangor via 395 to "The Airline" out to Wesley. I had put an offer in on a home on Ebeemee in Brownville - but it didn't work out - now I'm building my own Downeast.

                  Gotta love their sign:


                  I'll take a closer look and see what MEC had - I recall seeing some steam restoration efforts on MEC locomotives as well.

                  Jump in - the waters warm on Blender - there's just so much information available - it's such a big change from 3DC where I haven't had anyone to really talk about anything - for many years.

                  Regards,
                  Scott
                  Last edited by scottb613; 01-13-2023, 06:45 AM.
                  <a href=https://www.trainsim.com/forums/filedata/fetch?filedataid=80663&type=full title=thumb_80663.png >thumb_80663.png</a>​ My Blender Models

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by eric View Post
                    Fantastic work.

                    There were a number of examples of Pacifics being shrouded partially or fully... The CNW and MILW's are favorites of mine.
                    Hi Eric,

                    Thanks - yeah - I guess they did have some unique looking Pacific's. So many steamers - so little time [sigh]. The shroud ("skyline casing" on the B&M) was a new kind of shape to model for me - as I haven't had to make anything like it before. It took a little doing.



                    Regards,
                    Scott
                    Last edited by scottb613; 01-13-2023, 06:58 AM.
                    <a href=https://www.trainsim.com/forums/filedata/fetch?filedataid=80663&type=full title=thumb_80663.png >thumb_80663.png</a>​ My Blender Models

                    Comment


                      #11
                      What the Maine Central had: I don't know how much this will help, but I have Trains of Northern New England by John Krause and Fred
                      Bailey (Quadrant Press, 1977). It has 15 pages about the MEC, mostly photos, mostly steam. A lot of the captions mention the engine number but not the type, and the type (number of trailing wheels, for example) is not always clear to me in wedge shots. But if you want me to look for something in the book, just let me know.
                      Steve Dunham
                      Drexel Hill, PA
                      www.stevedunham.50megs.com

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by Literalman View Post
                        What the Maine Central had: I don't know how much this will help, but I have Trains of Northern New England by John Krause and Fred
                        Bailey (Quadrant Press, 1977). It has 15 pages about the MEC, mostly photos, mostly steam. A lot of the captions mention the engine number but not the type, and the type (number of trailing wheels, for example) is not always clear to me in wedge shots. But if you want me to look for something in the book, just let me know.
                        Hi Steve,

                        Thanks for looking - for me it's a passing interest - as I've got way too much on my plate right now...

                        Regards,
                        Scott
                        <a href=https://www.trainsim.com/forums/filedata/fetch?filedataid=80663&type=full title=thumb_80663.png >thumb_80663.png</a>​ My Blender Models

                        Comment

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