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2Qs-How to See Next Signal Status & Where to Get Signal Guide

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    2Qs-How to See Next Signal Status & Where to Get Signal Guide

    I'm running Rail Simulator.com's Train Simulator 2013 on Steam. I'm attempting to do the Duff Coal career mode scenario. It's on the Great Western Mainline and is using the Class 47 Triple Grey loco. I'm looking out the window to see the status of the next signal, but when I see a red one, I'm going to fast to stop. Obviously, I need to slow down.

    Is there anywhere in the user interface where I can see the next signal's status or is looking out the window the only way?

    Also, is there a signal guide for this game? Right now, all I'm going with is green means good to go, yellow means caution may be red ahead, and red means stop here. When the signal is yellow, apparently I need to slow down in case I need to stop at the next signal. How much should I slow down to?

    Other than that, I don't know what the difference is between one yellow and two yellows or if there's two different colors together.

    Any help is appreciated.

    #2
    I find the signal guides for routes in the manuals for the routes. They should be located in your Steam folder.

    Comment


      #3
      There is no signal guide for TRainSim2013. It was removed by MS. The only thing I have been able to find is a signal guide for BNSF which helps a lot, but isn't always entirely accurate.

      Two things that I find helpful:

      1. Go BING to images - BNSF signal lights. You will find a colored chart showing light positions and meanings.

      2. I always save my trip at .70 before the signal. If it turns out to be a major screw-up because I did it wrong, I can back up and proceed again knowing what is coming.

      I agree that is is frustrating, especially when the signal is hidden around a sharp curve or completely obscured by a train passing on the track beside me. It's no way to run a real railroad - that's for sure!

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        #4
        Thanks for the replies. I did eventually muddle my way through the scenario well enough to pass.

        @bdietz2.0 - I eventually found where you were talking about: C:\Program Files (x86)\Steam\SteamApps\common\RailWorks\Manuals\EN This will be useful for future scenarios. Thanks!

        @Mountin Man - It's a shame to hear that a more comprehensive signal guide was removed. I think I found the chart you're referring to. I'll have to become more familiar with railroading nomenclature to fully understand it. I guess actually looking out the window for the signal status is the only way. That's fine; I just wanted to make sure I wasn't missing something. Your tip about saving is definitely a smart one.

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          #5
          When you "look out the window", don't forget to zoom all the way in. That gives you more advance warning since you can usual make out the signal at half-a-mile or so, sometimes, more.

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            #6
            Another helpful tip. Thanks!

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              #7
              Interesting manual -about half of the pages carry the statement "Unable to render this page".

              I am way less than impressed with this product.

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                #8
                You can always hit the tab key to see if you get the warning that the request for clearance has been denied. If you don't get the warning the next signal will not be red.

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                  #9
                  Red signals are the least of my worries. Many of the signals require slowing considerably and taking other measures despite the HUD display continuing to insist on the maximum speed limit, and predicting the required ETA based on maintaining full speed.

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                    #10
                    Read this:



                    You'll know everything you need to know about signals on any route.

                    Robert
                    sigpic

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                      #11
                      If I read the OP correctly, it looks as if this is referring to signalling on Paddington to Oxford, some basic principles of UK signalling are here:


                      4 aspect signalling is generally used where traffic density is high with double yellow an advanced caution, i.e. next signal is at single yellow with the following one at red. In real life the signalling is designed so that a service brake application on first sighting the double yellow will provide adequate margin to come to a stand at the red.

                      In real life drivers would learn the route and be expected to know where the next signals are and develop a feel for natural braking point so the earlier versions of RW and its predecessors which showed the next signal aspect was something of a cheat!
                      Vern.

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                        #12
                        Great article, NW, and in reality, the same concept. Every signal, except STOP tells you what the next signal is, and what to do at the next signal.

                        I had great deal of difficulty with the concept until a retired engineer explained it to me.

                        If the Signal is Yellow, or Approach: Stop at the next signal. Don't change that mindset until you get to the next signal, and then do what it says to do. You may creep up on a CLEAR signal at 3 mph, but you'll never run a STOP signal.

                        Robert
                        sigpic

                        Comment


                          #13
                          UK signalling practice is slightly different in that, other than ATP or TVM430 fitted lines, there is no mandated speed restriction associated with a caution or advanced caution signal. It is entirely down to the driver's experience and line knowledge/prevailing conditions as to how much he slows down.
                          Vern.

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