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Dashcam of BNSF derailment/explosion

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    Dashcam of BNSF derailment/explosion

    Couple towing a camper driving on I-40 at the NM/AZ state line when the derailment happens. Camper suffered a melted awning system.

    My mother and father in-law, Ed & Kathy Rasich were traveling when they caught this terrifying footage on their dashcam the moment the train derailed and an ...
    My Open Rails videos https://www.youtube.com/channel/UClc...1kBPO2A/videos

    #2
    Saw that on YT a few days ago. Really frightening.

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      #3
      I wonder how many cars were on that train? The NTSB and the FRA REALLY need to re-evaluate this "Precision Scheduled Railroading".

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        #4
        Originally posted by motormaster532 View Post
        I wonder how many cars were on that train? The NTSB and the FRA REALLY need to re-evaluate this "Precision Scheduled Railroading".


        As far as I know, BNSF does not use PSR. But I do agree, this practice does needs to be scrutinized. At least this wreck happened out in the middle of nowhere and not near civilization.

        Train was carrying 35 cars that were carrying non odorous propane and gasoline, among other mixed freight. Half dozen caught fire and were burned.
        Kyle

        NYC - Road of the Future

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          #5
          Originally posted by Orbita View Post



          As far as I know, BNSF does not use PSR. But I do agree, this practice does needs to be scrutinized. At least this wreck happened out in the middle of nowhere and not near civilization.

          Train was carrying 35 cars that were carrying non odorous propane and gasoline, among other mixed freight. Half dozen caught fire and were burned.
          Thank You Kyle! They might not be into PSR,but I have observed "monster" trains on the Transcon. Derailments are serious business! In 30 years of running,it was the ONLY thing that I did not experience,thankfully! I wont speculate on the cause,that is for the NTSB and BNSF to discover. I just believe that these "monster" trains have seriously cut the margin of safety to a dangerous level. Take Care,Brian

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            #6
            Yeah, because shorter trains never derail, right?...

            The automatic criticism of PSR is one I'm skeptical of without data to prove an argument.

            Yes, trains are longer, but they've been getting longer, taller and heavier for the past 75 years.

            Meanwhile, fatal accidents and catastrophic derailments appear (at least to me) to be down.
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              #7
              In the casual reading I do....especially news about corporations & government --- it appears to be gospel that the big railroads have cut back on maintenance and safety....trying to maximize shareholder benefit....like fewer detectors and such....that was one criticism leveled against NS after the derailment in East Palestine, Ohio​. True?...partially true....false??? Does it apply to other roads?
              Cheers, Gerry
              "A mind is like a parachute. It doesn't work if it is not open." Frank Zappa
              It's my railroad and I'll do what I want! Historically accurate attitude of US Railroad Barons.
              Forever, ridin' drag in railroad knowledge.
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                #8
                BNSF isn't "PSR", but there practices are very similar. Same with the railroad I work for. Thankfully for us, we have a limit of 11,000 trailing tons or 10,000 trailing feet, whichever comes first.

                But, the whole PSR thing really needs to go away. The cutbacks of work force among all the fields under the blanket of PSR, is the root of what we are seeing now, with less upkeep on freight cars, track side equipment, proper maintenance of the right of ways, etc, all for the shareholders to earn more in their pockets.

                I guess that is just from viewing it on the inside and how much has drastically changed since the introduction of "PSR", rather than outside looking in. shrugs.
                -Shawn K-
                Derby Rail Shops
                Maine Central Mountain Division: 20% Track, 10% Scenery.

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                  #9
                  The vast majority of people waving their pitchforks about PSR have no clue what PSR really means. PSR *usually* leads to longer train lengths *with certain traffic types, in certain shipping lanes*, but not always. When UP implemented PSR in the Spokane area, it actually led to *shorter* train lengths south of Spokane on the Ayer Sub, because rather than running a single Spokane-Hinkle manifest (which would then get split at Hinkle into cars to go east and west on the UP mainline), they instead ran a Spokane - Hinkle manifest (for Portland-bound traffic) and a Spokane - Nampa/Pocatello train for traffic destined to go east.

                  PSR, when it is working properly, means running the same train at roughly the same time each day, with a focus on grouping traffic heading to similar destination (which all sounds great in theory). "Second sections" of the same train symbol are avoided at all costs, which means they are going to run a 10-15,000 foot monster on days where there is enough traffic for it. If the number of cars exceeds the maximum they can possibly manage to throw on that day's train, it will wait until tomorrow. Or the next day. Or the next day. In pre-PSR logic, in there was excess traffic for a few days they would just run a second extra symbol, or depart the same symbol more than once every 24 hours to "catch up". With PSR logic, they don't want to do that. PSR has also led to lots of weird frankenstein trains of mixtures of manifest, intermodal, etc. (if it is heading to a similar destination) because there is so much obsession on not taking any more "train slots" than needed. Which inevitably is going to slow the intermodal traffic down because of the extra tonnage.

                  Anecdotally, I heard last year from a former CN dispatcher that on good days, PSR worked remarkably well. Trains would depart within the same few minutes every day, meets would occur at almost identical places day-to-day (which of course leads to the railroad thinking they can get rid of "redundant" sidings). Last month down on the UP Gila Sub in Arizona, I saw remarkably similar traffic patterns / timing each day.

                  But the moment one thing goes wrong/not to plan, the whole fragile structure falls apart. All of those sidings that got removed because they were redundant on "good days" are suddenly badly needed when an incident has caused the timing of all the trains to change, and a backlog of delayed trains need to get through. With CN, in those situations apparently lots of people were trying to cheat the system. As just one example, to avoid punishment, if management realized that a particular train wasn't going to depart the terminal "on time", they would have a crew depart the train and only bring it to the first siding, then get a van back to the yard and repeat the process. All of the accounting metrics made it look like trains were departing on time (thus "dwell time" looked short), but in reality they were just creating capacity messes to clean up later.

                  Deferred maintenance is nothing to do with PSR itself - but deferred maintenance and PSR are motivated by the same thing, which is pleasing Wall Street / reducing operating ratio. So often a railroad that is doing PSR is one that is trying to cut costs to bare minimum, which means they are likely going to cut costs in other ways too. It's all about short term financial gains, without any care for long-term stability of the railroad.
                  Last edited by PerryPlatypus; 05-08-2024, 11:20 PM.
                  ~Sean Kelly~
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                    #10
                    I wouldn't say East Palestine was the result of quantity or spacing of wayside detectors, but rather the lack of time being allotted to preventative maintenance by the carknockers who have been pushed from from past practice of allowing minutes per car inspection to 30 seconds per car or so. This is where dangerously wearing out parts get missed. Will the near $1 billion cost of this wreck finally sink in? Heck, Graniteville was only $60 million or so, and there 9 people died from chlorine inhalation.

                    That said, I think there is a bit of a financial shakedown going on from East Palestine officials. This town was big in the pottery and china manufacturing business that was largely completely killed by 1990's trade deals, and with no economic Plan B of what to do next, someone has to pay for those 30 years of grievance and misery. Looks like it is Norfolk Southern's turn the social reparations barrel.
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