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Thread: US Terminology

  1. #1
    DNJ Guest

    Default US Terminology

    Hi there - Could I ask you guys across the pond about US railway (sorry - railroad ;) ) terminology? The reason I ask is that I'm interested in building a US route. Fictional sure, but it would be useful if I got everything labelled right. I have the list in the MSTS manual already, and I'm not too worried about engine and rolling stock differences - I'm more concerned with locations, facilities etc.

    For instance, you seem to call some stations depots? Is that right? What exactly is a stockyard? This is the kind of stuff I need. Any help is gratefully appreciated.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 1999
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    Corfu, New York, USA.
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    Default RE: US Terminology

    [font size="1" color="#FF0000"]LAST EDITED ON May-20-02 AT 08:09PM (EDT)[/font][p]Yes some stations are called depots, what the difference is I don't know. A stockyard is an area for the loading and unloading of cattle. Don't know if they're used anymore, as I've never seen a real cattlecar. There are also roundhouses, turntables, hump yards just to name a few. Hope this helps some.

    Bill [Link Expired]


  3. #3
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    Default RE: US Terminology

    I THINK (there I go again-- been cautioned against it)that a station is the big huge thing in big huge cities (Washington, NYC, Dallas, Houston, LA, Sacremento, etc. depots are for like West, Texas (an actual city, 15 min north of me) Belton, Montana. Atleast, thats what I think. Hope this helps. Someone PLEASE correct if wrong!

  4. #4
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    Default RE: US Terminology

    In the US, the piece of track that allows you to go from one track to another is called a switch. I believe it's called points in the UK.

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    Valley Center, KS, USA.
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    Default RE: US Terminology

    [font size="1" color="#FF0000"]LAST EDITED ON May-20-02 AT 10:13PM (EDT)[/font][p]Some of the translations I might suggest:
    UK = USA
    Triangle = Wye
    Sleeper = Crosstie (tie)
    Chair = Tieplate
    Platelayer = Trackman
    Footplate = Cab
    Guards' Van = Caboose
    Engine Shed = Engine House
    Points = Turnout (Track Switch)
    Stoker = Fireman
    Driver = Engineer
    Shunter = Switch engine (switcher)
    Banker engine = Helper Engine (pusher)
    Level Crossing = Grade crossing
    Passing Loop = Passing Siding

    I'm sure there are a lot more.


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 1999
    Location
    Beaverton, Oregon, USA.
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    Default RE: US Terminology

    US -- UK,others

    Truck -- Bogie
    Car -- Wagon, van
    Truck (highway) -- Lorry
    Bumper -- Buffer

    [Link Expired]
    Cal Rasmussen
    Beaverton, OR

    Columbia Gorge Route (15% done, The Dalles yard(started) and dam(researching) in progress)
    Cal Rasmussen
    [email protected]
    Columbia Gorge Route

  7. #7
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    Default RE: US Terminology

    [font size="1" color="#FF0000"]LAST EDITED ON May-21-02 AT 12:22PM (EDT)[/font][p]I'm not sure about this, but I thought I read in a previous post on this site that a turnout is a model railroader's term for a switch. It's used to prevent confusion with an electrical switch, which controls current to a piece of track. Ask a real railroad person what a turnout is, and they probably won't know. Ask the same person what a switch is, and they'll have an answer. Perhaps a real railroad person reading this thread can clear this up.

  8. #8
    SHEPLEY1935 Guest

    Default RE: US Terminology

    Turnout is a common RR term for a switch leading to a siding or industrial track.


    Don Shepley-Chicago

  9. #9
    Dria Guest

    Default RE: US Terminology

    ...I just step in to thank you all; a good side effect of trainsimming is improving my English... :D

    Andrea "Dria" Obinu
    Savona, Italy

    http://dria.monrif.net

  10. #10
    DNJ Guest

    Default RE: US Terminology

    Thanks to everyone who responded. Hump yards, are they some kind of marshalling yard/freight siding?

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