Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Thread: Canadian Caboose Use

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    2,134

    Default Canadian Caboose Use

    I'm trying to work with the various CNR/CPR cabin cars I downloaded recently, and I'd like to know a couple of things:

    1. When were the last wooden cabins phased out in Canada?
    2. When were cabins phased out in favor of FRED and other EOT devices?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Saskatchewan, Canada.
    Posts
    636

    Default RE: Canadian Caboose Use

    I remember the first Steel Caboose on the CNR in 1967 or '68, in Edmonton, Alberta. The number 79249 comes to mind, but don't quote me. As for the wooden cabs, the last time I worked on them was around 1971. The steel ones took over around that time. These times aren't all that precice, but close. They may vary across the system. My experience was in mostly in British Columbia on the west coast.
    The general end of the cabooses on the CNR began around the end of 1989/spring of 1990. There are still a few being used on road switchers and the sort, but very few. Hope that helps.

    cheers,
    Ernie :)


  3. #3
    USRailFan Guest

    Default RE: Canadian Caboose Use

    So cabooses were kept longer in Canada than in the US? To my knowledge most US roads had stopped using cabooses in the mid-80s?

    A bit weird tho that many roads purchased brand-new cabooses in the late 70s/early 80s, when they were going to quit using cabooses only a few years later....

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Metro Vancouver
    Posts
    3,030

    Default RE: Canadian Caboose Use

    >I remember the first Steel Caboose on the CNR in 1967 or
    >'68, in Edmonton, Alberta. The number 79249 comes to mind,
    >but don't quote me. As for the wooden cabs, the last time I
    >worked on them was around 1971. The steel ones took over
    >around that time. These times aren't all that precice, but
    >close. They may vary across the system.

    My experience was
    >in mostly in British Columbia on the west coast.

    Ernie then that means they were out east yrs before we had them in the west.




    > The general end of the cabooses on the CNR began around
    >the end of 1989/spring of 1990. There are still a few being
    >used on road switchers and the sort, but very few. Hope
    >that helps.
    >
    > cheers,
    > Ernie :)

    Just Rollin Down The Tracks
    http://www3.telus.net/apickell//squamishsub.jpg
    Dale
    Work Safe play hard

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    2,134

    Default RE: Canadian Caboose Use

    I would imagine that it was an ICC/FRA change at the Federal level and also a change in the laws of the States as well. The Commonwealth of Virginia was reportedly the last of the United States to drop the requirement for the caboose on trains that weren't locals, and I think that was in 1986.

    When you're dealing with laws, things can go 180 degrees overnight. :P

  6. #6
    USRailFan Guest

    Default RE: Canadian Caboose Use

    >When you're dealing with laws, things can go 180 degrees
    >overnight. :P

    LoL.. Yeah, I've studied law, so THAT is one thing I know

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    2,134

    Default RE: Canadian Caboose Use

    Yes, it does help; thank you. Since most of my CNR fleet either existed prior to or right around 1971, I can use any of them with abandon. Were pushers cut in ahead of them, or were those cabins sufficiently reinforced to handle being the first recipient of the pushers' power?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Cranbrook, BC, Canada.
    Posts
    32

    Default RE: Canadian Caboose Use

    I worked for CNR in Ontario, 1968 to 1970. If I remember correctly, the wooden cabooses were still in use in yard transfer service between Port Arthur Yard and the Neebing Yard. They were not in use on the road (main line) at that time they had been replaced by the "modern" steel cabs with electric generators and mounted lights as opposed to the old kerosene lamps that were hung out.

    I understand that they were not put ahead of pushers but pushers had to be cut in ahead of them as they could not handle the stress.
    I remember one incident where a yard transfer coming into Neebing yard came around the corner and ran into a train that had been made up on the main line with a wooden caboose. Needless to say the caboose was turned into splinters and toothpicks in a hurry.


  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    2,134

    Default RE: Canadian Caboose Use

    Those facts are useful. Now I just need to figure out how to hack a timeframe code into my already crowded freight car nomenclature system. :D That, or convince someone to make a CP Rail cabin.

    The only reason I know anything about pushers and cabins is because of a photo in the new Penn Central book, where an ex-NYC cabin had to be placed behind pushers at Horsehoe Curve; the author comments (somewhat nastily) that such cabins weren't supposed to be assigned for trains headed over the curve.

    At least the wooden cabin went out doing what it was designed to do, instead of a rude pyre somewhere.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Saskatchewan, Canada.
    Posts
    636

    Default RE: Canadian Caboose Use

    "...then that means they were out east yrs before we had them in the west."

    Yes I believe that's probably true. Maybe someone from the eastern lines could fill us in on that.

    cheers,
    Ernie :)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •