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Thread: Erie Triplex

  1. #1

    Default Erie Triplex

    I'm opening a can of worms but...
    Would anyone be interested in Erie's experimental Triplex? I've been mulling it over in my mind to start one. It's a rather odd engine and seems a bit complex to tackle (not to mention the other four ongoing projects) but I thought I'd make a start.

    Judging from the word Triplex, I'm assuming there was no articulation. With a rigid wheelbase of 80 feet or better I can see why it didn't catch on.

    Does anyone know where info on this locomotive can be found?

    Frank Musick
    Lehigh & Atlantic Railway, Canal Navigation Company
    [Link Expired]


  2. #2
    smyers Guest

    Default RE: Erie Triplex

    Frank;

    I believe the Triplex was articulated, a 2-8-8-0 with a third set
    of 8 drivers under the tender. A compound Mallet, all cylinders were of equal size, the middle cyls receiving b.p. steam and exhausting into the front and rear cyls for the x2 compounding.

    "Too many legs and not enough steam" was a comment I read about them. Never as successful as hoped.

    Virginian had one or two, as well.

    Good luck getting that one into the sim!

    Steven D. Myers

  3. #3
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    Default RE: Erie Triplex

    Frank, I'm interested in ANY kind of big steam :D ! If you ask me, do go ahead!

    Cheers,

    D.M.

    "Homini plurima ex homine sunt mala."

    - Plinius Maior, Naturalis Historia 7,1,5


  4. #4

    Default RE: Erie Triplex

    Thanks for the info...I think all I've ever seen is a photo.

    There's a website somewhere, but the bulk of the site said "There was also a Quadraplex proposal, but nobody was interested". I did read it was a Baldwin concept, which goes to show that even the most successful builders miss the mark sometimes.

    I had always thought it was articulated, but the Pennsy usage of the word "duplex" on rigid wheelbase steamers like the Q and the T threw me off. If I follow you right only the first two sets of drivers were articulated in the "normal" sense. I'm assuming the third set was "rigid" in the sense that it didn't swing independent of the tender. That being the case..I could short cut things a bit. Take an existing Mallet and create the odd tender for it. By the way...Do you guys pronounce that "MalLIT" or "MalLAY". I think I've heard both (not that i hear a lot of conversations on the subject).

    I wish I was interested in 60's and newer diesels...Might be easier from a modeling perspective. But NO, I gotta like the oddballs like Camels and Mother Hubbards and such. Even the diesels I like are critters like Sharks and Centipedes.

    I guess somebody has to love the ugly stuff :D

    Frank Musick
    Lehigh & Atlantic Railway, Canal Navigation Company
    [Link Expired]




  5. #5
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    Default RE: Erie Triplex

    The inventor of the articulated compound locomotive was named Anatole Mallet. He was French (or francophone Swiss?), so I'd say his surname is pronounced "mal'y(t)" (where the bracketed "t" would mean soft intonation).


    D.M.

    "Homini plurima ex homine sunt mala."

    - Plinius Maior, Naturalis Historia 7,1,5


  6. #6

    Default RE: Erie Triplex

    Malyeet? I'm assuming the soft "t" sounds as in wallet or is more of a silent "t" so you end up with "malyee"...

    Or does it sound more like "Malley" as in the Gordon Lightfoot song Canadian Railroad Trilogy...
    "We are the malleys who work upon the railroad"

    As he dates himself and people shake their heads and wonder who Gordon Rightfoot is)

    It's one of those things you have to know...Supposing you're at an NMRA cocktail soiree and you mis-pronounce Mallet in polite conversation...
    "Suddenly there was a profound silence...Every guest in the room turned to stare at the uninitiated stranger in their midst. Then was a growing murmur as the stewards moved through the crowd. Taking the man by the arms they drag him towards the exit. "I mean Mallay", he cries. "Mallit"..."Mallyee" His screams recede to a whisper as the great doors close behind him. "Mallet, Indeed!", says the portly woman in the grey gown. There is a low hum of general agreement. The guests, satisfied that the intruder has been dealt with, return to their quiet conversations over cognac and chianti...

    Frank Musick
    Lehigh & Atlantic Railway, Canal Navigation Company
    [Link Expired]



  7. #7
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    Default RE: Erie Triplex

    Yup, I meant that the "t" should have only a very light intonation...wrote that first post shortly after getting up from bed :-lol .


    D.M.

    "Homini plurima ex homine sunt mala."

    - Plinius Maior, Naturalis Historia 7,1,5


  8. #8
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    Default RE: Erie Triplex

    Hehe, I'm much more familiar with Gordon Lightfoot (had a few of his records, y'know, those round black vinyl things before CDs to the youngsters) than I am with cognac, chianti, and portly women in gray gowns!

    I've heard Anatole's surname pronounced mal-LAY', fwiw. But I'd be thrown out of that cocktail soiree for reasons other than mispronunciation!

    Back to the topic, here's a link:

    http://www.toytrains1.com/mallet.htm

    and:
    http://www.steamlocomotive.com/articulated/eriep1.html

    and also, the Whyte System:
    http://home.att.net/~Berliner-Ultrasonics/whytesys.html

    John Roth
    [Link Expired]

  9. #9
    smyers Guest

    Default RE: Erie Triplex

    Frank:

    That's how I understand it. The rear set was rigidly attached to the tender frame. The "engine" itself was more or less a normal
    2-8-8-0. None of the Pennsy duplexii were articulated.

    Steven D. Myers

  10. #10

    Default RE: Erie Triplex

    Thank you for the links!

    The only photo I have ever seen is the Matt Shay. Even the ad for a brass loco moons ago in MR used that picture.

    I never knew about the rear stack (or the trailing truck). What an odd contraption. Kind of glad Baldwin never built a Quadraplex.

    I take it the model shown is O or S scale. Not exactly a "toy".

    I like the reference to the LV shops at Sayre...Gives all the Lehigh guys a legitimate excuse to run this Erie beast on their routes, while keeping the rivet counters at bay. I can't help but think how strange it would look as a Camelback if the Lehigh Valley had adopted the idea.

    It seems I recall several monstrosities from that period that would also pull the couplers right out of the cars. I've read that the Reading helpers at Gordon were Mallets with similar tractive force. I believe Pennsy had some too. They always appear in photos with those huge carbon-gas headlights. Makes 'em look like Norfolk and Southern Y6a's. They ended up as pushers because of their habit of creating second sections from the trains they pulled.

    Now if only I can get GMAX to load, I can test drive the MSTS gamepack making one of these beauties :D

    Hmmm...a Camelback Triplex.

    Frank Musick
    Lehigh & Atlantic Railway, Canal Navigation Company
    [Link Expired]



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