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Thread: So Long 8159

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
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    Butler, Pensylvannia, U.S.A.
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    1,758

    Default RE: So Long 8159

    Appears she sustained some damage along her frame to the rear as well.
    Jon Clark - Butler, Pa

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 1999
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    In a bar...
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    2,275

    Default RE: So Long 8159

    The sooner the better..I'd take a GE over a SD40-2 every day of the week and twice on sunday!
    --BNSF Conductor--

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Germansville, Pennsylvania, United States.
    Posts
    1,066

    Default RE: So Long 8159

    no GE can replace an EMD, you rarely see old GE's, the GE u23Bs from LV there are few left, WHY, they kicked the bucket, example #2, EMD SW1 #(i forget) from the lehighvalley, is still operational, its just on display, but it was still operation in 1981!!!! vs the GE which is no where near as old....The thing is I think is the railroads want to look good, and buy the GEVOs for the enviroment, spend millions on 1 loco, have it last 10 years, scrap it, and buya new one. When they could buy an SD90MAC for less on the dollar, have it last double, rebuild it, and reuse it in smaller service ;)
    The Lehigh & New England Preservation Society: Bringing Home the L&NE 611!!!!
    For Donation information Come Visit us at: www.facebook.com/lne611 or PM Me

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Gaithersburg, Maryland, You Ess Of Eh.
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    2,562

    Default RE: So Long 8159

    Hey, as long as they're taken care of, any engine can be "good". It sounds like they don't take care of the SD40-2s over there, Kyle. But after 30 years of service, it's not like it was all for nothing. It costs more to run that engine than it dose to get rid of it.

    Simply progress. Just thought it was neat that we have that engine for the sim.-Jeffrey

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
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    901

    Default RE: So Long 8159

    Farewell, 8159. It will always be remembered.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    .
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    1,276

    Default RE: So Long 8159

    Not everyone "grew up" in the air conditioned comfort cab. Its understandable that young'uns behave this way.


  7. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Zuerich, ZH, Switzerland.
    Posts
    4,018

    Default RE: So Long 8159

    > spend millions on 1 loco, have it last 10 years, scrap it, and buy a new one.

    Hm, although the US and its class 1s is not quite my home turf, this mentality - if indeed true - leaves me somewhat shocked or baffled. 8-10 years is about when I expect an engine to be in for the first, mid-sized maintenance job (partial rebuild, replacement of worn parts), and 15-16 years is when I expect it to be in for a total overhaul (complete rebuild, replacement of all critical parts regardless of their state).

    Being used to a typical lifespan of 50 to 60 years for locomotives, and 40 to 50 years for carriages and freight cars with my home carriers, I can understand that a 30 year old wrecked or structurally damaged engine is not being sent to another heavy maintenance visit / overhaul. But otherwise, those SD40's don't look that old to me to be overdue for retirement... When were they built? 1970s/1980s?

    Lukas a.k.a Swissie

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Gaithersburg, Maryland, You Ess Of Eh.
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    2,562

    Default RE: So Long 8159

    Well, it may be a common attitude with younger railroaders, but it certainly is a two way street. Guys 30 years from now will be dreading some dogcatch job with some ancient C449s or something.

    But like the EMD F Unit, and GP9, the Dash 2 series of GM products recall the fond memories of many people, career railroader and railfan. The SD40-2 totally has it's own fan base. It also has to do with which side of the cab wall you're on.

    I know I love the sounds and looks of a worn SD40-2, but I also know that the crew must be either sweating themselves silly or freezing from that draft no one can seem to insulate themselves from. (where is that wind coming from dammit?!)

    Anywho, I seriously doubt some career railroader's opinion is going to challenge the established popularity of a product to a bunch of train goons.


    I'm sure both camps could produce plenty of examples of an SD40 crapping out on the road, or a new GE something or other being shut down by the mainframe because it thinks something is wrong.

    -Jeffrey

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 1999
    Location
    Houston, TX.
    Posts
    1,456

    Default RE: So Long 8159

    >> spend millions on 1 loco, have it last 10 years, scrap
    >it, and buy a new one.
    >
    >Hm, although the US and its class 1s is not quite my home
    >turf, this mentality - if indeed true - leaves me somewhat
    >shocked or baffled. 8-10 years is about when I expect an
    >engine to be in for the first, mid-sized maintenance job
    >(partial rebuild, replacement of worn parts), and 15-16 years
    >is when I expect it to be in for a total overhaul (complete
    >rebuild, replacement of all critical parts regardless of their
    >state).

    Basically that statement is shocking and baffling because, to put it mildly, the statement is pure rubbish.

    I don't know if you had the phenomenon in Europe, but the mentality is similar to what took place when diesels replaced steam in North America. There was a substantial group of fans that *knew* that steam was superior to diesels. And no so-called facts, however expounded on by the folks that were actually running the railroads, were going to change their minds.

    To put it in perspective: it's like claiming that a 1970's vintage automobile is operationally superior to the ones available today.

    Take care,

    Henry

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Zuerich, ZH, Switzerland.
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    4,018

    Default RE: So Long 8159

    Hi Henry,

    > To put it in perspective: it's like claiming that a 1970's vintage automobile is operationally superior to the ones available today.

    Well, not quite, either. This has nothing to do with the old units being better than the new ones, au contraire. Of course the newer engines are operationally superior to the older ones, which is why whenever a new generation arrives, the previous one gets pushed out of the hottest assignments to some less important mainline task, with the even older generation previously doing this less important mainline task being pushed further down to local duties, and the former local units being relegated to do switchyard duties etc.

    What I can't quite understand from an investors perspecitive is why a 10 year old locomotive should be old and worn... Financially, there are substantial differences between operating a piece of machinery a business invested a lot of capital in, and a private road vehicle you buy like a consumer good (you pay the price you are able and willing to pay, and then you forget about it). The investment of a firm needs to be paid back, and you can be **** sure the accounting department makes sure this happens to the last cent. Once it's done, accounting insists that the longer you can keep the fully paid units working and earning their money, the more economic sense this makes - at least until maintenance cost and the issue of missing spare parts outnumber the earnings.

    Speaking with operators here in my home turf, most agree that the units in the fleet that are aged between 20 and 40 years are their cash cows. They're fully paid, yet they are still in excellent shape as they just had their second or third heavy maintenance (rebuild), while they are numerous enough so that spares abound.

    Lukas a.k.a Swissie

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