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Thread: Save the planet, use less metal, go narrow gauge. ;-)

  1. #1

    Default Save the planet, use less metal, go narrow gauge. ;-)

    You don't need big locomotives to have fun, go Green, go narrow gauge. A DRGW K27, class number 450, slide-valve type, Mikado.

    Cheers Bazza
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Anaheim Hills, California.
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    1,523

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    Nice.

    Will this have a slope back tender? Looks kind of like the original style with the large headlight.
    Matt
    Click Here for photos of my train layouts

  3. #3

    Question Tender query

    Quote Originally Posted by SouthwestChief View Post
    Nice.

    Will this have a slope back tender? Looks kind of like the original style with the large headlight.
    I don't know Matt, whether the K27 had a slope-back job, because none of my resource helpers have mentioned that. Did they have them and do you know of any pictures, please?

    Cheers Bazza

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Czech Republic and Germany
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    1,514

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    Hi!

    Wow, that is a wonderful model! Even on this small picture it looks like an incredibly detailed engine! Great work, as usual! Thank you very much!

    Cheers!
    Michael

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Peoria, Illinois
    Posts
    752

    Default

    Just get us some "Clean" coal, and we'll see about the environmental impact.

    Looking good.
    The Jeremy Clarkson of MSTS...sort of.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Viola,Ill
    Posts
    80

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    " Save the planet, use less metal, go narrow gauge"

    DEAL
    See ya, Seth
    Long Live NKP 765 and C&O 614

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 1999
    Location
    Where Standard Gauge is 3 feet between the rails.
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    10,170

    Default

    The K-27's did indeed ship to the D&RGW with slope backed tenders, they were also Vauclain Compounds, and had four cylinders, two per side, one high pressue, one low pressure, and slide-valve gear. The arrangement was less than stellar, and resulted in the rebuilds with the slanted inboard and outboard cylinders, which the D&RGW had built to replace the Vauclain Cylinders. They were VERY different than the current appearance, and would take a LOT of work to produce.



    They didn't stay this way for long, all of them being rebuilt in under 10 years. I'll have to look it up, but I believe the frames were reworked at the same time, meaning they were kind of like the Woodman's Axe...

    Robert
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