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Thread: Rough Terrains

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    Concord, NC
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    Default Rough Terrains

    So, as I'm modeling the route which is in the Appalachia mountains, I realize that there are alot of hills and mountains (duh) and very little flat land. I know that some railroad companies run alongside the mountains or drill a tunnel through it, but I'm wondering about the hill-y parts. Do they just carve through it until everything is somewhat level, or do they make a long mound of dirt & ballast?
    Sean Summer
    CEO of Blue Ridge Mountains Machine works.

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Stevens Point, Wisconsin, USA.
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    Talking How long is a piece of rope?

    Asking one of them "it depends" questions, 1853 don't have much money so I make a 4% grade over hill over dale and skip the tunnels and fills. 1930 got more money and dynamite instead of black powder, make the roadbed more level and bore tunnels or make cuts thru the hills. Tunnel, cut, fill or bridge? Depends on the situation and what I intend to run over it, if it's a logging railroad I'll just go up and down hills and use a Shay, skip all the engineering stuff. In general, make a cut until it becomes too high, then it's more practical to bore a tunnel than to remove all the dirt and rock. Make a fill until it gets too deep to fill in, then use a bridge.

    https://www.trainsim.com/vbts/showthread.php?t=264104

    Some of the basics, need to experiment with the cutting, embankment, width, and brush size for the magnet tool. It don't take too long to get the hang of it, when I posted that tute I only had railsim for a few weeks.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
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    Florida
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    Default

    Well, there are a few techniques avalible to you.
    Check out some of the methods used in the trans canada system.

    There are areas where they bore out into the hillside, and use the waste material to fill the next valley.
    Tunnels were expensive and dangerouse...

    You can do a switch track, where you go up the incline to the switch. Change the switch and then back up the next section, over and over.... only really practical for short consists though.

    Theres the ratchet system, not very popular. Only used on some very steap inclines. Check out the railway that climes to the top of Snowdon in Wales.

    Theres a winch / pully system, again only used in a few places, on long steep grades. Consists of a winch at the top, and a pully at the bottom, and a long wire that runs between them. Creates some fun when you go back down it though...

  4. #4
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by adriansw View Post
    Well, there are a few techniques avalible to you.
    Check out some of the methods used in the trans canada system.

    There are areas where they bore out into the hillside, and use the waste material to fill the next valley.
    Tunnels were expensive and dangerouse...

    You can do a switch track, where you go up the incline to the switch. Change the switch and then back up the next section, over and over.... only really practical for short consists though.

    Theres the ratchet system, not very popular. Only used on some very steap inclines. Check out the railway that climes to the top of Snowdon in Wales.

    Theres a winch / pully system, again only used in a few places, on long steep grades. Consists of a winch at the top, and a pully at the bottom, and a long wire that runs between them. Creates some fun when you go back down it though...
    It's not the mountains that I have a problem with. I either curve the track around them or put a tunnel through them.

    It's the hill-y valleys between the mountains lol.
    Sean Summer
    CEO of Blue Ridge Mountains Machine works.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 1999
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    Stevens Point, Wisconsin, USA.
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    14,705

    Cool Welcome to the Surveyors Team, grab your pick and shovel

    https://www.trainsim.com/vbts/showthread.php?t=282090

    Post 3 in that one, some of my surveying misadventures. Didn't see any crocigators in the hills, but plenty of heffalumps and woozles in the valleys. Curious, this one was my first attempt at DEM, never tried it with MSTS, and since I do fictional routes what I got here is a fictional route on real terrain. To my way of thinking that complicates the process since you don't have markers to follow, you gotta survey the easiest grades to decide where to route the right of way. Are you doing a fictional route too?

    Edit: Forgot to mention, no actual change in the technical aspects of route development yet, so some of youse guys might want to browse thru assorted threads in the RS route forum for tips.
    Last edited by sniper297; 08-12-2009 at 02:38 AM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    Delmont, PA USA
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Shortliner View Post
    It's not the mountains that I have a problem with. I either curve the track around them or put a tunnel through them.

    It's the hill-y valleys between the mountains lol.
    To achieve a reasonable grade into valleys you can't "economically" avoid, it becomes necessary to gradually lower the track elevation. Switch backs are a good way to do that. Perhaps a tunnel along that way to avoid carving up mountains. The big curve in Altoona, Pa. is an example of an elevation changer.
    Regards - Dick
    i5 2500K$ 4.2ghz, GTX 750 2gb, 8gb of SkillFULL memory, A 700 watt power thingy, lots of cables
    Program to take screenie weenys from da puter. Bro, Dude, Man operator Murysville,Pa.



  7. #7
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    Where Standard Gauge is 3 feet between the rails.
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    Default

    And sometimes, when all else fails, you build one of these:





    And when it falls down, you replace it with this, using iron.:



    Then, when that one collapses, you bring out the big stuff:



    And if all that doesn't work because you built it on the windiest spot in the Continental United States, and it scares the bejeebies out of the passengers - you move the line 4 miles north where there's no valley to cross...

    Robert
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    Last edited by rdamurphy; 08-12-2009 at 08:48 AM.

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