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Thread: Protecting files from defrag?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Staten Island, NY, US
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    48

    Default Protecting files from defrag?

    Well, I've been suffering from having to use MSTS on an outdated laptop (on XP) that is probably not going to make it through 2010, and my only other computer has an unfindable hard-coded registry error (Vista), but I had to recover the laptop from a corrupted registry, then run the disk defragmenter. I found out that it had tampered with the AEM-7 sound file.

    Whether this is a stupid question or not, I have to ask this. Can I protect my MSTS files so that the disk defrag doesn't mistake them for orphaned or corrupted files? Or do I have to reinstall everything?
    Last edited by aem7amfleet; 12-15-2009 at 08:18 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 1999
    Location
    Eltham, Australia.
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    Default

    Hi Chris,

    I doubt that it was the defragger alone that caused the problem.
    A corrupt registry could do anything.
    Running a defragger on a corrupted disk is asking for trouble.

    Derek
    Cheers
    Derek

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    Default

    I am going to guess that you do not properly understand what a "defrag" is. I'll explain it if you're curious, but first it sounds like your hard drive has some corruption and you need to fix it.

    Go to My Computer, and then right click on the drive in question and do a Properties on it. Go to the Tools tab and click the Check Now... button.

    Tell it to automatically fix errors but don't scan for bad sectors. Click Start. You will probably get a notice about and need to restart your computer to complete the check.

    Your Registry problems may be a bit more complicated to fix, depending on what they are. There are commercial programs around which profess about fixing Registry problems, but I do not hold much stock in them. If I were you I would find a computer-nerdy friend or take it to a reputable repair shop, who should know how to fix it. If you do not have any such friends and don't want to spend any money, then 1) backup your data! 2) reinstall the operating system or restore your system to default [from factory].

    The two best ways to avoid data (hard disk, Registry) corruption are:

    • Always properly shut down your computer. Do not just shut it off unless it is frozen up and you can't get it to do anything else. Always tell Windows you're going to remove media before you do it. (Use the Safely Remove Hardware thingy that should be on the "system tray".)
    • Get an Uninterpretable Power Supply (UPS--battery backup). I recommend APC.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Staten Island, NY, US
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    Default

    The registry corruption was fixed, and the defragmenter was run after. I'll just reinstall the packs. Thank you.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 1999
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    Eltham, Australia.
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    Default

    >The registry corruption was fixed,
    In my experience, that is not always the case.

    The registry is far too complicated for there to be a program that can say that the registry is NOT corrupted.

    The most likely cause of defrag damage is if the directory information (pointers to the location of the files) is corrupt. By this I mean that the directory entries are not pointing to the files properly, so that when moved, the files are now incomplete.
    Last edited by derekmorton; 12-18-2009 at 11:13 PM.
    Cheers
    Derek

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