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Thread: Juniata shops

  1. #1
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    Default Juniata shops

    What is that font? Is that the famously impossible to find PRR font? I hear there is a font called Craw Clarendon that is as close as you can get to the PRR font without breaking into their offices. I can't find that one either though.



    This was going to be my next SW1500 repaint, but if I can't find a close enough font, I'll cut my loses now.


  2. #2
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    Looks more like PRR Extended.
    Cheers!
    Marc - 3DTrains - Home of the Feather River and Sherman Hill routes for MSTS

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hack View Post
    Looks more like PRR Extended.
    Ahh, I knew you'd come to the rescue! You're right, they do look like that. For $10.00 I might as well grab it!

    Thanks Marc!

  4. #4
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    The only Craw Clarendon I can find you is for hot metal presses, or for house numbers! Craw Modern is available here http://www.windowfonts.com/download-...clarendon.html .

    Have you seen this posting on Trainboard.com http://www.trainboard.com/grapevine/...p/t-75688.html ?

    I found this extended quote about the Clarendon family of fonts on http://cg.scs.carleton.ca/~luc/typography.html :

    Clarendon
    The original Clarendon is due to Robert Besley (1845). Robert Bringhurst writes: Clarendon is the name of a whole genus of Victorian typefaces, spawned by a font cut by Benjamin Fox for Robert Besley at the Fann Street Foundry, London, in 1845. These faces reflect the hearty, stolid, bland, unstoppable aspects of the British Empire. They lack cultivation, but they also lack menace and guile. They squint and stand their ground, but they do not glare. In other words, they consist of thick strokes melding into thick slab serifs, fat ball terminals, vertical axis, large eye, low contrast and tiny aperture. The original had no italic, as the face had nothing of the fluent hand or sculpted nib left in its pedigree.
    Mac McGrew adds: Clarendon is a traditional English style of typeface, dating from the 1840s, the name coming from the Clarendon Press at Oxford, or, according to some sources, from Britain's Earl of Clarendon and his interest in that country's Egyptian policies. (Such faces were classified as Egyptians, and inspired such later designs as Cairo, Karnak, Memphis, and Stymie.) Early Clarendons were used primarily as titles and display faces, for which their strong and sturdy nature was well suited. They have the general structure of romans, but lack the hairlines typical of those faces. Being heavier, the traditional Clarendons were often used as boldfaces with romans, before the family idea provided matching boldface designs.
    McGrew continues his discussion by pointing out various revivals and typefaces with strong similarities: Similar faces were known as Doric or Ionic, before more individualized type names became common; in fact, all three names were sometimes used interchangeably. Most foundries had versions of Clarendon, and sometimes Doric and Ionic, in the nineteenth century, but most of these faces were obsolescent by the turn of the century. However, a few were copied by Linotype, Intertype and Monotype, and thus given a renewed lease on life. Clarendon Medium of BB&S was formerly known as Caledonian. ATF had a similar face known as Ionic No. 522. Keystone showed Clarendon Condensed in 1890. Clarendon [No. 51 of BB&S was called Winchendon by Hansen, and extended to 48-point. Like many pre-point-system faces, some foundries adapted them to point-system standards by casting them on oversize bodies, others on undersize bodies with overhanging descenders. In the later 1950s Stephenson Blake in England revived several of these early Clarendons under the new name of Consort, which became a popular import (and the source of some of our specimens). Consort Bold Condensed is said to be the first Clarendon, of 1845. (Some added members of the Consort family are noted under Popular Imports in the Appendix.) In 1953 a new version of Clarendon was developed by Hermann Eidenbenz for the Haas Typefoundry in Switzerland and later acquired by Stempel in Germany. The Haas Clarendon was copied by Linotype in 1966, in light and bold weights, and about the same time Ludlow brought out three weights of essentially the same face. This was created primarily to set the newspaper ads of a large department store, but it was a good addition to the resources of Ludlow. ATF commissioned a modernized rendition of Clarendon from Freeman Craw, and this was brought out in 1955 as Craw Clarendon (q.v.). About 1961 Monotype brought out Clarendon Bold Extended, similar to Craw Clarendon but heavier. Also see Ionic, News with Clarendon, Manila. [Google]
    Alan
    See this thread for my railway photos https://www.trainsim.com/vbts/showth...78#post1935978

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlanCh View Post
    The only Craw Clarendon I can find you is for hot metal presses, or for house numbers! Craw Modern is available here http://www.windowfonts.com/download-...clarendon.html .
    I saw that, but the download link was dead. Which prompted me to post this thread.

    Looking at Craw though, it's close, but not as good as this pay font. The J was totally wrong on the Craw font.

    Thanks though!
    Last edited by styckx; 03-31-2010 at 12:33 PM.

  6. #6
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    Ok, I had this issue with the BNSF one and left it as is since it was so minimal, but I'd like to see if there is an actual solution to this.

    I can't get the stripes on this side of the locomotive to meet and line up evenly. The stripes on the curved section are on a seperate section of the template, and all one layer. If I nudge them up, then they will be a hair higher than the others. As you see, they are a hair lower than the ones they are supposed to meet up with. It seems like I'm a 1/2 pixel off no matter what.




    The opposite side, everything works out perfect.


  7. #7
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    Marc, thanks, just got the font! PERFECT!


  8. #8
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    Glad to help.

    The switcher is the one Derek, at RS.com, created, no? If so, perhaps dropping him a note might yield results. The model is of the best looking locos in RW, and I would hate to see something as minor as a mapping issue prevent you from perfecting that repaint of yours.
    Cheers!
    Marc - 3DTrains - Home of the Feather River and Sherman Hill routes for MSTS

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  9. #9
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    Blah. I don't see that happening, wouldn't fixing that render the other two skins useless/broken? Plus I doubt anyone else will notice or mention that little problem.

    I'll finish it but that hairline misalignment will just drive me nuts knowing it's there.

  10. #10

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    That's a handsome repaint.

    One thing I noticed from the original photo you posted: the letters of "Juniata" are more spaced out on the prototype. Look at the gap between the N and the I for example.

    Regards,

    Rob.

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