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Thread: How To Start A Train Going Uphill

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Forest Hills, NY
    Posts
    915

    Post How To Start A Train Going Uphill

    I put a train in the siding at Bealville.

    Now some questions, both on how to stop a train on a steep hill, and how to get it started again.

    1 - When stopping a train on a steep hill, should the train brakes be applied while the throttle is still on? I tried to apply the brakes after turning off the power, and of course the train started going downhill. Is some backwards motion to be expected, i.e. slack going in?

    2 - How does an Engineer in real-life get the train going again?

    3 - In Run 8, is there a way stop the individual cars from going backwards? If yes, in a 6000 foot train, how many cars should be secured?

    Robert

  2. #2

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    I can answer #2:

    With the train brakes (or parking brake) on, throttle up to Run 3. Apply the independent brake, then release the train brakes (or parking brake). Start the sand. If you're using train brakes, once the train brakes hit around the low-to-mid 80s, slowly release the independent brake. On a train with DPUs, you should stay below 1400 amps. On a train without DPUs, you should stay around 1100 amps. Be careful how quickly you throttle up beyond 3. Once your train is moving, you can stop the sand.
    Nick - Creator of the Virtual Railroading Review Show

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada.
    Posts
    3,587

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    Try checking out the help section of your program. It will link you to some very good articles including how to start your train on a grade step by step.

    Thanks

    Sean

  4. #4

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    What I do:

    1. Before you start slowing down, take note of how many amps are required to hold a constant speed. Then throttle down to about notch 2 - 3 so that you are under 5 mph and gradually slowing as you approach the stopping point. Apply about 8 - 10 psi of train brake and let the train come to a stop. Then apply full loco brakes to hold the train, then cut the throttle.

    2. With full loco brakes on, release the train brakes and throttle up so that you have at least enough amps to hold the train (see #1). As the brake pressure at the rear of the train starts rising, you can slowly release the loco brakes to get moving. You have to watch for broken couplers as you notch up each time. You might need to add a small amount of loco brakes (10 - 15 psi) each time you notch up to control the extra power to avoid breaking couplers. Then feather off the loco brakes as the speed rises. With 4 locos at the head end, the couplers are in danger as you go above 1250 amps. With 5 locos, be careful over 950 amps.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    UP's Santa Barbara subdivision - USA
    Posts
    166

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Train-a-Mania View Post
    I can answer #2:

    With the train brakes (or parking brake) on, throttle up to Run 3. Apply the independent brake, then release the train brakes (or parking brake). Start the sand. If you're using train brakes, once the train brakes hit around the low-to-mid 80s, slowly release the independent brake. On a train with DPUs, you should stay below 1400 amps. On a train without DPUs, you should stay around 1100 amps. Be careful how quickly you throttle up beyond 3. Once your train is moving, you can stop the sand.
    Yes....notch 3 is the sweet spot for this.

    I'll never forget my first run from Bakersfield when I got Run 8 and having to save just before Bealville to go do errands. When I fired it back up and realized I was being dragged backwards by my train, I knew I was where I wanted to be physics-wise in a train sim.
    EMD 2-strokes rule! My all-time favorite:SD45X I also like SD40-2/SD40T-2/SD45-2/SD45T-2/DD35A/DDA40X/SD70ACe/SD80ACe
    i7-7700HQ // 16GB DDR4 // GTX 1080 // 2TB SSD + 1TB HD // 17" 144Hz FHD w/G-Sync // TS2021 // TSW // T:ANE // Run 8 V2

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada.
    Posts
    3,587

    Default

    I find some grades and trains need notch 4. Now I was told IRL that wasn't the smartest thing to do. However 3 in some situations your train will roll back on you.

    Thanks

    Sean

  7. #7

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    And ideally you will have DPU's to fence when starting from a stop at Bealville or Woodford, or most any other place on the hill. Be VERY careful if you have only head-end power. I could not get a four-unit head end power stack train started at Woodford the other day after letting the alerter go off on me. Train would not move in N4 and broke a coupler at N5. Thru some experimentation yesterday, I discovered the only way to start the train there was to isolate one of the four units, allowing a higher notch without amps getting so high as to break a coupler. The fewer active units on the head end, the higher the amperage allowed before breaking couplers.
    Last edited by flarrfan2; 01-21-2013 at 08:28 PM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Forest Hills, NY
    Posts
    915

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Train-a-Mania View Post
    I can answer #2:

    With the train brakes (or parking brake) on, throttle up to Run 3. Apply the independent brake, then release the train brakes (or parking brake). Start the sand. If you're using train brakes, once the train brakes hit around the low-to-mid 80s, slowly release the independent brake. On a train with DPUs, you should stay below 1400 amps. On a train without DPUs, you should stay around 1100 amps. Be careful how quickly you throttle up beyond 3. Once your train is moving, you can stop the sand.
    Nick:

    Is the parking brake in Run8 the equivalent of having the train brakes fully applied, or is it just specific to this program?

    Thanks,

    Robert

  9. #9

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    Rob, the Parking Brake is the equivalent of having the handbrake of every car set.
    Nick - Creator of the Virtual Railroading Review Show

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by flarrfan2 View Post
    Train would not move in N4 and broke a coupler at N5. Thru some experimentation yesterday, I discovered the only way to start the train there was to isolate one of the four units, allowing a higher notch without amps getting so high as to break a coupler.
    The correct technique in that situation would be N5 plus a small amount of loco brakes to absorb some of the power being put to the wheels. This technique is described at the end of this page, and works very well in Run 8: http://www.alkrug.vcn.com/rrfacts/hp_te.htm

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