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Thread: Another PD&A Screenshot

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 1999
    Location
    Jacksonville,, FL, USA.
    Posts
    3,625

    Default Another PD&A Screenshot

    Colleagues,

    Tonight, John Collinson has put his office car on the rear of a hotshot intermodal train
    headed east from Goulding Yard (Pensacola, FL) to Jacksonville in order to get a good
    look at the bridge named in his honor.

    (True History: Collinson was a a former Chief Engineer and Pres. of Chessie System and
    had retired around the time CSX was consolidated in Florida. When a low level, often
    damaged by hurricanes, bridge with a swing span over Escambia Bay, northeast of
    Pensacola, was replaced with a modern high level concrete bridge in the 1980s, it was
    named the John Collinson bridge and bears that name to this day. Until late August
    of 2003, one could usually see this bridge in daylight, eastbound on the Sunset Ltd.
    Westbound, if on time (a rare event) it crossed this area around 2 am.

    The bridge to the left is the InterState 10 bridge.

    collinson_brg.jpg

    J. H. Sullivan
    (aka landnrailroader)

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    MS gulf coast
    Posts
    91

    Default

    I've seen this bridge on numerous occasions, never saw a train on it though!! Looks to have a short stiff grade coming out of Pensacola, at least it appears that way.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 1999
    Location
    Jacksonville,, FL, USA.
    Posts
    3,625

    Default

    There is approximately a 1% grade from either shore, for about 2/5 of the length. The middle, roughly 1/5 is rounded over
    and the top of the grade is over the channel. There is a paper mill and some other industry, west of the bridges and so
    both the RR and I-10 have this peak over the channel so barges etc. can go underneath. Escambia Bay is a prong off
    of Pensacola Bay, which is in turn off of the Gulf of Mexico. You can easily see this bridge on Google Earth by starting
    at Pensacola and working northeast along the bay shore. The tracks are no more than a few feet above high tide for
    most of the distance.

    J. H. Sullivan
    (aka landnrailroader)

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