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Thread: Changing Headlight Color to Tungsten-based

  1. #1

    Default Changing Headlight Color to Tungsten-based

    One thing that is driving me nuts is the headlight color of most engines. It's a perfect white, and the ENG files are showing a color of ffffffff, which I don't know how to interpret. I would like a way to translate what that means and what the color configuration should be to reflect a yellowish tungsten-based headlight, which is more correct for older engines from the 1800's to now.

    Thanks in advance for suggesting which 8-digit formula I should use to replace the ffffffff in the programming to show a tungsten-based headlight, which has a slightly yellowish cast.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by dennis4225 View Post
    One thing that is driving me nuts is the headlight color of most engines. It's a perfect white, and the ENG files are showing a color of ffffffff, which I don't know how to interpret. I would like a way to translate what that means and what the color configuration should be to reflect a yellowish tungsten-based headlight, which is more correct for older engines from the 1800's to now.

    Thanks in advance for suggesting which 8-digit formula I should use to replace the ffffffff in the programming to show a tungsten-based headlight, which has a slightly yellowish cast.
    HEX Colors

    Scale - Dark to Light (or) Amount of Intensity/Saturation:

    0123456789abcdef

    Color Picker:

    http://www.w3schools.com/tags/ref_colorpicker.asp

    More Info:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_colors





    Update:

    Sorry, I forgot that there are SIX Digit Values, AND EIGHT Digit Values



    In a RGB color space, hex #ffffff (also known as White) is composed of 100% red, 100% green and 100% blue.

    The 8-digit hex is an ARGB color. It is the same as usual RGB, but provides an extra alpha channel.

    (ALPHA Red Green Blue) = ( AA RR GG BB )

    00 to FF = (0 to "100%")

    RED = FFFF0000
    GREEN = FF00FF00
    BLUE = FF0000FF



    Sorry, I can't remember how the ALPHA "AA" works.
    Last edited by MCDemuth; 01-21-2015 at 01:42 AM. Reason: Added More Info
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  3. #3
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    Hi Folks,

    To the best of my knowledge - the first two digits are the intensity of the light... I usually tone mine down a bit...

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    Decimal to Hex is useful when adjusting headlights - here's a link on how to use your windows calculator for the chore, if you're like me and can't do the math in your head.

    http://www.wikihow.c...-to-Hexadecimal

    Good for changing decimal numerical color values to Hexadecimal -- for example 125 = 7D (Hex)
    Cheers, R. Steele [Gerry] It's my railroad and I'll do what I want! Historically accurate attitude of US Railroad Barons.


  5. #5
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    As has been said, these are hexadecimal ("HEX") numbers, which means "16-ciffer numbers", as each digit can have 16 values, from 0 to 9 and further with A for 11 thru F for 16.

    The HEX numbers for colors in a graphics file and for the light definition in the ENG file work the same, as has been said, with a format of AARRGGBB (AA = two digits for Alpha channel (transparency in graphics / light intensity in ENG file), RR = two digits for the red part, GG = two digits for green, BB = two digits for blue).

    As each color component has two digits, of which each can take 16 values, you have a range of 256 values (0-255) for each color component. The higher a number you choose, the more of the respective color you will get (the more transparent / the brighter the Alpha channel will be).

    Examples: In order to reduce the brightness of a #FFffFFff light (case does not matter in writing it up), change it for example to #99ffFFff.

    As has been mentioned, there are tool in which you can actually see which color you are creating, and then just need to copy the composed HEX value. EG, most paint programs such as PaintDotNet can show the HEX values of a color selected.


    A good start for a slightly yellow light would for example be 90ffF375
    Cheers, Markus


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  6. #6
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    Hi Marcus,
    ...each digit can have 16 values, from 0 to 9 and further with A for 11 thru F for 16.

    I'm probably being a little pedantic here, but A is 10 and F is 15!! Therefore 10 in hex is 16 decimal.

    Cheers,
    Ged

  7. #7
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    I'm not sure when you say headlight color if you are talking about just the visual of the ( headlight ) or the ( Sphere of light ) you see shining ahead on the track, I normally change both. I also change the ( angle ). Most engine files have unrealistic angles like 30, were something like 12 is closer. I guess they are trying to light up the whole county

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    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?f...6726983&type=1
    Like this? Trying to match the hex to get this effect
    Nitin
    Railfan, India.
    http://www.ir-msts.in/

  9. #9

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    Thank you to ALL of you for your comments and suggestions!! I really appreciate your help. Eventually, I'll have a MSTS New Haven line with at least 20 trains of traffic between Stamford and New Haven, CT, and I'm planning on uploading the Activity file to TrainSim. By the way, I'm the guy who built the NH American Flyer and stainless steel coaches back in 2001 or so. Back then, my program completely crashed, so I haven't returned until now. I have A LOT to learn, but it's fun and a challenge!!

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