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Thread: Anglecocks/Brakes

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Western Australia
    Posts
    68

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    Quote Originally Posted by P834C View Post
    Thanks for posting the detailed and correct info.
    Yes he explained it far more succinctly than I could.

    In theory a truck shouldn't be able to run away because of the braking system and hence my original question, but I think the collective wisdom of you fellas has sorted that one out.

    Getting back to trucks they can run away, just like a car use them too much and they will overheat. Here in WA we have runoff areas on big hills to "catch" a road train if it runs out of brakes.

  2. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aussie_FX View Post
    Yes he explained it far more succinctly than I could.

    In theory a truck shouldn't be able to run away because of the braking system and hence my original question, but I think the collective wisdom of you fellas has sorted that one out.

    Getting back to trucks they can run away, just like a car use them too much and they will overheat. Here in WA we have runoff areas on big hills to "catch" a road train if it runs out of brakes.
    We have those in Colorado. They're called "runaway truck ramps". They're built going uphill, and use a soft sand so that anything driving on them will eventually stop by being buried up to the axels.

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Western Australia
    Posts
    68

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    Ours are a little different, we run up a grade too but no soft sand or gravel to bog the truck, you'd never pull out 170 tonne so we have buffers that you can roll up against - touch wood I've never seen one used.

    Here is how we get our fuel delivered.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XbmY59nLD0g

  4. #34

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    Wow! I'd hate to have to share the highway with one of your "road trains"!

  5. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brad3816 View Post
    I'm trying to be helpful as that's pretty much all I do is switch cars in BNSF Bakersfield on the Depot+. I'm glad you ("duh we know") understand air flow & brake behavior. Seems you're the only one that is having this 'problem' which started when you decided to ("now I'm getting into switching") do switching. If my info doesn't help you, ignore it.
    Brad, I apologize for the "duh we know" remark. Not cool by me. Everyone's contributions benefit us all.
    -Glenn
    Last edited by gltech; 08-12-2017 at 04:03 AM.

  6. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by P834C View Post
    Thanks for posting the detailed and correct info.
    You're welcome. I'm definitely no know-it-all, but I have a small company with 3 trucks, so a truck's air system is something I do know.

  7. #37

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    I've seen a book on the history of the Overseas Railroad that described Flagler's private car as using a spring to apply the brakes, and air to hold them off. The book is totally wrong, as I've viewed the car, and it had an earlier model triple valve consistent with the car's age. I'm wondering if the confusion arose due to the practice by some car manufacturers on their earlier passenger cars to include a spring to help retract the brake piston when the brakes were released. Of course if you took a real close look, you'd see that the spring didn't do anything to apply the brakes.

    We railfans are just loaded with "arcane" knowledge (LOL!)
    Last edited by byelen; 08-12-2017 at 11:40 PM. Reason: misspelling

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