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Thread: Meanwhile in Minnesota...

  1. #11
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    Jun 2013
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    Minnesota
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    Quote Originally Posted by CSRX View Post
    Haha, to be fair I always enjoyed the look of the simple "H1"? Scheme. The Nike style logo I could do without though, To me that looks better on the freight cars than it does the locomotives.
    Couldn't agree more. The swoosh looks great on their army of hoppers. But on engines, I think H1 was perfect on standard cab engines and even on the Dash 9s, despite the fact that it looks like it doesn't fit on the nose. H2 worked on widecab engines very well. I never got into H3 all that much, probably because all the interesting stuff is too old to be in those colors.

    Quote Originally Posted by CSRX View Post
    Maybe a AT&SF history buff could be able to let us know. I only know most of Maine and parts of New Hampshire and Vermont.
    Yeah, who do you Eastern types think you are, acting like you know everything!? (as I try not to burst out laughing while I type this)

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by CSRX View Post
    A shot in the dark, and don't quote me, but it could have been an order that ATSF had made, prior to the merger, that may have not been fulfilled until sometime after the merger..
    It was a valiant effort, but I'd say unlikely. That order appears to have been placed after the corporate parents had merged and after the ICC gave their approval. Besides, paint isn't something that's unchangeable once the orders start rolling.

  3. #13
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    Minnesota
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    Alright, a few more photos:

    One of a few cars on the Builder with "your link to (something)" written on the side. I've also seen "your link to the slopes"
    Builder_1.jpg

    I've never noticed how much dust comes off loaded coal trains. Loaded ore trains can do the same thing, but usually only when a lot of pellets are dislodged from the cars, which can happen when they are filled to the brim and the slack runs in
    Coal_Dust.jpg

    The one and only Republic Locomotive RD20. It was tried out by UP in the early '90s, but because it never worked well, they went with gensets instead. There are some better shots of it at http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/Loc....aspx?id=34103. It has sat at Independent Locomotive Service in Bethel, MN for the last few years. The picture was taken using a pair of binoculars as a sort of zoom feature, since my phone's zoom feature isn't all that.
    LETX_20.jpg

    A trainload of windmill parts, in this case just hubs and generator housings
    Wind_1.jpgWind_2.jpg

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
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    USA
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    The BNSF story goes that in the early years right after the merger BNSF was going to use both paint schemes at the same time. Then eventually the settled on using just the one ( orange and green) scheme. I am thinking that the cost had something to do with it.

    Ron

  5. #15
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    Apr 2015
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    Burlington, VT
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    Dust flies normally if dirt near by the tracks is lose as well. Especially high speeds. I've noticed this on numerous occasions at work. There is a crossing that is dirt, that we go over at 40mph. Talk about not being able to see much after the locomotives go over.

    There is another spot I don't care about, when the dirt is dry and we are switching the customer out, the traction motors like to kick up a lot of dust, and typically this blinds me, even with safety glasses on. As much as I hate walking in mud and wet feed, I prefer that over dust.
    http://i.imgur.com/wcbfygM.png
    Conductor/Engineer at Vermont Rail System

  6. #16
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    Minnesota
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    I guess I've never seen dust kicked up by dirt crossings, probably because I don't remember the last time I saw a train at such a place. At least, during the day. The dust from ore trains is pretty impressive, just because lots of pellets fall out when the slack comes in and shake loose some dust when they hit the ground, and some actually go under the wheels and get pulverized (you can sort of hear it when it happens). I'll have to find my picture of the area after a loaded train goes through - it's just a brown haze. The only thing more impressive is steaming ore when it gets cold, since the pellets are still hot from being processed

  7. #17
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    Jan 2006
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    Hanover Park, Il., USA.
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    Love the pictures I've seen of the ore trains in the cold winter up in your neck. Like you say, the white ground and trees, colors of the train, and the hovering cloud of steam is just a great photo op.
    Neil

    Here at home, in the railroad mayhem capital of the world.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
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    Burlington, VT
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    Quote Originally Posted by ebnertra000 View Post
    I guess I've never seen dust kicked up by dirt crossings, probably because I don't remember the last time I saw a train at such a place. At least, during the day. The dust from ore trains is pretty impressive, just because lots of pellets fall out when the slack comes in and shake loose some dust when they hit the ground, and some actually go under the wheels and get pulverized (you can sort of hear it when it happens). I'll have to find my picture of the area after a loaded train goes through - it's just a brown haze. The only thing more impressive is steaming ore when it gets cold, since the pellets are still hot from being processed
    I know that sound all too well. The feed cars we pull out of the feed mill sidings tend to get a lot of mud, wet on the wheels, eventually drying and making dust on the top of the rail, with the wheels crushing it. It's neat at night because you can literally see sparks from under the wheel shooting out.

    I've only hauled very small pellitized Iron Ore, not the full on size big chunks. Apparently it's used in the process of making Pavement and Cement. Things I didn't know about until now.
    http://i.imgur.com/wcbfygM.png
    Conductor/Engineer at Vermont Rail System

  9. #19
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    Minnesota
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    Big chunks? Ours are only about the size of marbles. You might be thinking of pig iron, if that's what it's called

  10. #20
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    Apr 2015
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    Burlington, VT
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    That could be. Now that I think of it, we only haul Iron Ore Tailings.
    http://i.imgur.com/wcbfygM.png
    Conductor/Engineer at Vermont Rail System

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