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Thread: Various screenshots with no particular theme... Part 3

  1. #451
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    May 2010
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    Melbourne, Australia
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    Some fantastic shots since my last visit... and that rusty roof looks great Erick.
    Cheers!
    Pete

  2. #452
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    May 2010
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    Grand Rapids, Michigan
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    Quote Originally Posted by dreamcatcher1962 View Post
    Hi Erick ,

    Very, very WIP or not, it looks superb . I just love rusty old locomotives.

    Regards Claus (cvo2010)
    Awesome work, Erick. I have always been hesitant to say anything, but one thing I find lacking in the library is dirty power and rolling stock. 99% of it is pristine just-out-of-the-shop, but if you get on YouTube and look at real trains, even current ones, the majority of engines and cars are dull, faded, streaked, and just plain grungy. They are patched, have places patched with off color patches and all sorts of irregularities. I've tried a couple times to attempt to duplicate this grunginess", but me results were, shall we say, less than spectacular. It would really be nice to see more "well weathered" and "well used" equipment in the library, but based on my personal experiences, I take it this is really difficult to do.
    Larry Steiner
    Grand Rapids, Michigan


  3. #453
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    Nov 2010
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    All four CBR new GP38-2's pull a short train to home rails the 4 locomotives will be split as 2 for the east end 2 for the west. They will join the GP-15's in doing local and yard work. While the SD-60 GP-40,50,60 will do main line along with the GE 6 axle units.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  4. #454
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    Jan 2006
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    Hanover Park, Il., USA.
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    That's awesome! I was wondering if you were going to do any further buildup of your CBR power. I look forward to seeing more of your 4-axle power
    Neil

    Here at home, in the railroad mayhem capital of the world.

  5. #455
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    May 2010
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    Oklahoma
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  6. #456
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  7. #457
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    Jun 2004
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    Hastings, MN, 55033
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    Quote Originally Posted by geekman View Post
    Awesome work, Erick. I have always been hesitant to say anything, but one thing I find lacking in the library is dirty power and rolling stock. 99% of it is pristine just-out-of-the-shop, but if you get on YouTube and look at real trains, even current ones, the majority of engines and cars are dull, faded, streaked, and just plain grungy. They are patched, have places patched with off color patches and all sorts of irregularities. I've tried a couple times to attempt to duplicate this grunginess", but me results were, shall we say, less than spectacular. It would really be nice to see more "well weathered" and "well used" equipment in the library, but based on my personal experiences, I take it this is really difficult to do.
    It's actually really easy, but there is a process involved. The key ingredient is layer masks. A layer mask is an alpha channel for an individual layer in the image (say, a psd file) that is used to map its opacity, just like we use alpha channels on mesh geometry in OR. For this model, I traced the rust stains from a photo of the real Soo 377 in the time period I'm working in, and used the result (after correction for perspective distortion) as a layer mask. I then used a couple of brown hues and went crazy with different brush tools on this layer, using the photo for reference. The stains on top were a guess, but the same process applied. I used a mask I had on-hand that was made from a photograph I took of the inside of a rusty dumpster.

    Much of the dust in the cracks is a plain white layer set to "multiply." I then use a limited palette of brown and yellow hues to draw the dust in places where it should collect, again using photos for reference. The key is very low brush opacity. Once I get the basic dirt down, I pull it around with the drop water tool (I don't know if GIMP, PSP, or Photoshop have this, I use an old version of PhotoImpact), and further use bristle smear, smudge, and blur tools to manipulate the result.

    I have a second dirt layer which is a neutral grey and set to "lighting." This means that anything darker than 180,180,180 will darken the image (while adding the relevant hue) while anything lighter than 180,180,180 will lighten the image (also adding the hue). On this layer, I use the same basic colours as the dirt layer, but to different effect (the multiply layer will tend to darken the image, and the lighting layer can lighten it and add a bit of colour variation).

    The exhaust stains are pre-fab. Its a simple black layer, again with a layer mask, that I keep in a separate layered file and copy as I see fit. I use multiple iterations of it to create variation - I can half the opacity, and use two copies of it in one spot, but positioned slightly differently, to create a different overall stain.

    If this is starting to sound a lot like using Quixel, it's because it basically is. Part of this similarity, for me, is that PhotoImpact 4.2 requires me to create masks as separate images that are stored in a library, whereas GIMP (and I presume Photoshop) allows you to create masks on-the-fly. The disadvantage is that it takes a bit of extra work. The advantage is that, like Quixel, my masks are always on-hand and readily available in the image library. Mind, Quixel works in concert with 3DS to instantly display the result on a mesh, but the techniques I use are more or less a less automated (and more time-consuming) way of doing the same thing.

    The basic format of the image, from bottom to top, is like this:

    base colour > colour layers > weathering layers > text layers (the position of these depends on whether or not the dirt or rust carries over to the text) > detail layers (hinges, latches, panel lines, all set to multiply and with the relevant shadows part of the layer) > detail parts (trucks, rails, stanchions, et c - all things created as separate images and then pasted in) > shadow layer (AO render edited separately and pasted right in) > highlight layer (set to "addition" and 10% opacity) > top mask (to tidy up the result)

    Some of the weathering is drawn directly on the colour layers. The reddish-grey dust seen on the top of the hoods and cab is an example. Again, low brush opacity, a mix of brush shapes, and tweaking with other tools are what creates the variation that makes it look less perfect.

    More layers = more complex result. I like to take photos of rusty objects for use as layer masks later. I'll take the photo, convert it to greyscale, and tweak the brightness and contrast until I think it will be useful, and save it as a mask for later use.

    As far as the actual brush work goes, watch tutorials for weathering plastic models on YouTube. It's seriously the exact same process, but with greater ability to manipulate the result. It's basically just organized goofing off.

  8. #458
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    Jul 2006
    Location
    Louisville, KY
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    Thanks Erick, what an informative post! This should be a sticky or something. There are some great concepts here. I wish I had this years ago.

    Tyler

  9. #459

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    "It's easy" says the master . . .

  10. #460
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    Once you get the process down, it really is. I felt the same way about a month ago, then I started doing it, and realized I was spending most of my time goofing off and pushing bits of colour in random directions. The way you set your layers up is really important, though.

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