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Thread: The Ghan

  1. #11
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    Really interesting to me Bruce, the Indian Pacific was featured in the Railroads Australia series.

    Another route i would love to have in TS20xx is the run across the Nullarbor Plain.

    Ok i give in buddy, you have the longest one.

    Mike.
    Remember always that a wise man walks with his head bowed, humble like the dust

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by haverfordwest View Post
    .....Ok i give in buddy, you have the longest one.
    Size doesn't matter, Mike.

    Just a note on your Nullabor Plain route.......it is as boring as watching paint dry.
    After the first dozen or so kilometres of sameness - flat, desolate, scatterings of saltbush and the occasional flat salt lake followed by more flatness - it becomes uninteresting. After all, 400+ kilometres of dead-straight railway line doesn't have much to offer insofar as magnificent vistas go!

    The Nullabor is part of the route taken by the Indian Pacific.
    We drove to Perth (from Sydney) in 1975....back then there were still 300+ miles of dirt road, between Ceduna and Eucla, on the WA/SA border.
    On the return trip we did the train from Kalgoorlie to Port Pirie.
    If you are interested there are some words and pix HERE.
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  3. #13
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    Thanks for the info and link Bruce, nice one buddy.

    In regards Nullabor i watched the episode about the Indian Pacific. I quite like the idea of endless miles of nothingness.

    Of the US routes, i always prefer the long desert ones.

    Speaking of dirt roads, i am amazed at how much of Australia is only accessible on those type of roads buddy.

    I watch a tv proggie over here called Outback Truckers, all about Australian road freight.

    The impression it gives, is of a road system, of which only about 25% is tarmac.

    Mike.
    Remember always that a wise man walks with his head bowed, humble like the dust

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by haverfordwest View Post
    The impression it gives, is of a road system, of which only about 25% is tarmac......
    Those are "outback" roads, Mike.
    I would say that the percentage is the other way around - 25% of the total length of the Aussie road system is gravel.
    You can drive right around the continent, across it, up and down it (centre, east coast, west coast) all on bitumen highway.

    Only a very small minority live in areas with unsealed roads.
    This map will give you the guff.
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  5. #15
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    Oh i see Bruce, i got it wrong again. Looks like 70% of the population lives on the east coast.

    Any idea why there are parts of the coastal region, with a pop density the same as the interior, buddy ?

    Well that's what i gleaned from the map anyway Bruce.

    Many thanks for the link, knowledge is power

    Mike.
    Remember always that a wise man walks with his head bowed, humble like the dust

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by haverfordwest View Post
    ....Any idea why there are parts of the coastal region, with a pop density the same as the interior?
    Mike, the majority of the population is centred on the capital cities.
    In WA, it's Perth and the region around the coastal area and the same for Adelaide in SA and Darwin in the NT.
    Go anywhere away from those regions and the population drops markedly because the area is arid.

    A similar situation applies down the eastern side of the continent.
    Because the Great Diving Range runs from Victoria right up to the tip of Cape York, the eastern seaboard is wetter (the ranges capture the moisture) and therefore more fertile....thus the reason for the nation's population being concentrated in the east with Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane being the three cities with the majority of that eastern population.

    Move away from those cities and you are in rural areas....farms of various types (depending on the latitude).
    The population per square kilometre is much, much lower. Sheep, cattle and crops outnumber people!

    If you over-layed a rainfall map on the one in the link you would see why the population is located where shown; the rest of the country is much drier.
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  7. #17
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    Incidentally, SBS is broadcasting the full SEVENTEEN HOURS of non-stop, uninterrupted trip all day this Sunday!
    (That's the full 54-hour journey less the two night periods).
    Last edited by seagoon; 01-14-2018 at 04:27 PM.
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  8. #18
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    Makes sense really Bruce, geographically and demographically.

    Shame really such a large land mass and most of it is unused or extremely under utilised.

    SBS sounds interesting, but your day time is my snooze time buddy.

    Mike.
    Remember always that a wise man walks with his head bowed, humble like the dust

  9. #19
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    I watched some of the trip....from Alice Springs to Darwin...bits that were not in the 3-hour version.

    "Watched" is not really correct - I can understand why this type of thing is called "slow television'; I read a book, with the TV in the background, and would look up every now and then and look at a virtual window and see the landscape passing by.

    A very similar activity to what one would do when on the train itself.
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  10. #20
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    Did you get the sensation of movement though Bruce ? With your book occasionally jolting out of your eye line

    I like cab rides myself, there are 4 decent length Australian ones on YouTube, by David Nowak.

    Part one...................... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-nvYuFGNQ5A

    Mike.
    Remember always that a wise man walks with his head bowed, humble like the dust

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