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Thread: Slow updates with Microsoft updates on Win-7

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 1999
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    Jacksonville,, FL, USA.
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    3,446

    Thumbs down Slow updates with Microsoft updates on Win-7

    Colleagues,

    Yesterday, I got the usual message from my win-7 update messanger, that 4 updates serious
    updates were ready. My supplier advised me sometime back to immediately do the update
    in these situations, so I did. After a few minutes downloading the updates, preparing to
    configure, etc., the machine rebooted okay. Then it reached the point where it says that it
    is preparing to configure, do not turn off your computer. After 15 minutes, I called my
    supplier and he told me that this latest update is taking a very long time to handle this part
    of the update and asked me to time it. At approximately 1 HOUR and 15 MINUTES the
    update finished and boot continued and system was normal. My supplier then told me that
    one of his clients with slow machine (he built mine specifically to run MSTS in 2015) took
    more than 6 HOURS.

    So those of you that execute this update, be prepared for it to take a spell.

    J. H. Sullivan
    (landnrailroader)

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Pacific Time
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    751

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by landnrailroader View Post
    Colleagues,

    Yesterday, I got the usual message from my win-7 update messanger, that 4 updates serious
    updates were ready. My supplier advised me sometime back to immediately do the update
    in these situations, so I did. After a few minutes downloading the updates, preparing to
    configure, etc., the machine rebooted okay. Then it reached the point where it says that it
    is preparing to configure, do not turn off your computer. After 15 minutes, I called my
    supplier and he told me that this latest update is taking a very long time to handle this part
    of the update and asked me to time it. At approximately 1 HOUR and 15 MINUTES the
    update finished and boot continued and system was normal. My supplier then told me that
    one of his clients with slow machine (he built mine specifically to run MSTS in 2015) took
    more than 6 HOURS.

    So those of you that execute this update, be prepared for it to take a spell.

    J. H. Sullivan
    (landnrailroader)
    Your computer in general will be slower now too. You got the January security update for the Meltdown and Spectre bugs. Also, since your CPU is less than 5 years old, you probably got the Intel microcode patch too, which further slows things. Let us know if you start to get frequent random reboots; that's appeared (per the nerd press) in many (especially but not exclusively Haswell and Broadwell architecture) i-series chips since the microcode update, and Intel has advised people not to do them for a bit while they try to figure out what's happening. Not that you have much choice with Windows updates any more. You might want to talk to your supplier about reverting the January updates, especially if the reboot issue arises. There's an outside chance (if the Intel microcode updates were applied and can't be backed out) that you might need a new CPU.

    Good luck!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 1999
    Location
    Jacksonville,, FL, USA.
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    Default

    So far, so good. After completion of the update, and the reboot involved, it has not rebooted on it's own, and I haven't
    noticed any slower speed, although considering the speed of a quad-processor, it would probably take good instruments
    to detect much of a slowup. My practice is to "sleep" the computer when not in use, unless I am going to be out of town,
    and to reboot the machine weekly. The current Mobo and processor were installed in 2/2015.

    landnrailroader

  4. #4

    Default

    Is there a way to revert this update? I feel like it slowed down my PC for 10-20% at least. This sucks, man.

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    Pacific Time
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    You can revert it the same way you revert other updates. However, the January patches (which themselves got some later updates, especially for AMD CPUs which were soft-bricked by the original patches) do mitigate some serious errors in the CPU.

    Unless you have a new enough computer that the motherboard or computer manufacturer has issued (and you have applied) an updated BIOS with CPU firmware updates, you'll be getting your microcode patch through Windows in the normal update process. MS won't provide it, probably, for at least a month or 2 after Intel releases it, and Intel is still working on patches for on some CPU models. They have also abandoned work on patches for some old CPUs. See: MS Intel Microcode Updates (what they've issued so far) and Intel Microcode Revision Guidance (April edition). Windows-provided microcode patches, like the Linux microcode file, load with the operating system rather than the BIOS, so they will permanently slow down the startup process slightly. The Windows fix (the January update) for Meltdown works with or without the microcode patch (at some cost in computer slowdown depending on what your software does); the fix for Spectre only works (and only affects the computer operation) if CPU microcode patches to support it have been installed. The Meltdown patch's performance penalty ranges from nothing noticeable (most of us) to 20% or more (typically in computers running active databases).

    Other common reasons for slowdown shortly after a Windows update include: .Net got patched for something, and/or your antivirus (especially Windows Defender) got updated. .Net updates seem to happen every 2-3 months. After .Net gets patched, it has to regenerate its runtime packages, which can use a lot of machine resources in the background for up to a few hours. If you look in Task Manager and find "ngen" entries with activity, that's .Net at work. The antivirus update (especially for Windows Defender), usually triggers a system scan.

    If you actually do want to buy a new system to get the mitigations built in to the hardware (and therefore minimizing the performance effect), you may want to wait a bit. Neither Intel nor AMD is likely to have all of the hardware revisions they need to do completed until the next architectural update or the one after.

    Edit: also, the Meltdown/Spectre (especially Meltdown) patches are known to cause worse slowdowns with Window 8.1 and especially 7 than they do in 10. Partly, that's because of how Windows systems work internally, and partly it's because Windows 10 uses a "fast startup" feature (unless disabled) that partially hibernates the o/s on shutdown - speeding up the next start and avoiding the need to reload the microcode patches every time.
    Last edited by mikeebb; 04-16-2018 at 12:27 AM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    Default

    You can always opt out. It's your machine.
    Cheers, R. Steele [Gerry] It's my railroad and I'll do what I want! Historically accurate attitude of US Railroad Barons.


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