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Thread: Simplot reefers

  1. #1
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    Default Simplot reefers

    I have some Simplot reefer reskins closing in on completion for the F/L and was just wondering about the correct LD sound file for one of these?



    I read somewhere that some of the early reefers like these Simplots, some of the Cryo units etc used a tray system in the roof that delivered a CO2 "snow" to cool the load rather than a mechanical reefer unit. If that's actually correct would a regular "GenFreightWag.sms" be the right way to go rather than "reefer.sms"?
    Cheers!
    Pete

  2. #2
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    Something I found, may help if you haven't seen it already:
    Posted by CShaveRR on Friday, January 14, 2011 10:21 AM
    I think the MHW web information is slightly dated, Paul. The name is still Cryo-Trans, but their fleet has been 100-percent mechanically cooled for years now. Not even a museum piece left, as far as I know.
    There were other fleets of cryogenically-cooled reefers at one time (the J. R. Simplot cars come to mind), but I don't know what's happened to all of them (the newer JRSX cars, built as reefers, series 6000-6050 and 6100-6149, are still mostly in service, minus a few retirees; but the older 5000-series cars, rebuilt from SSW box cars, have been retired due to the age of the original equipment--from their Car Type Code, they haven't been rebuilt into mechanically-cooled cars)

  3. #3

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    Probably a key would be look to see if the cooling unit--engine, etc.--is on the end of the car. Those have evolved, too. A lot of the old PFE reefers, etc. used 2-cycle Detroit Diesels for power. They were noisy, as all "Screamin' Detroits" were. I believe the reefer "default" sound file in MSTS was based on the Detroit Diesel sound. A lot of the more modern units use air-cooled diesels, mostly likely Deutz engines? They're quite a bit quieter. I also think that the old Detroits were likely running anytime that the car was loaded, while the more modern diesels have sophisticated controls that start and stop the engine as needed. I believe that the latest generations of reefers use satellite communications to monitor location, temperature, and mechanical condition of the reefer and its cooling system. I would sometimes see solid reefer blocks stopped in Cheyenne when I lived there. You would hear the engines on the reefer units starting and stopping frequently. Most all of them also had a light on the refrigerator unit that would display green if all systems were working normally.

    I often wondered where they fueled the reefers--if they could go coast to coast on one tank of fuel. I know that Rawlins, Wyoming was a major fueling point for the UP for its locomotives. There was (is) a direct pipeline from the Sinclair Refinery at Sinclair, Wyoming a few miles east of Rawlins right to the UP fuel racks. I don't ever remember hearing about anything being fueled there other than locomotives, though.

    Maybe there is a reefer expert here (and not one of the ones talking about "doobies") that might know some of those answers.

    Nice looking reefers, by the way. Simplot is an interesting company. Simplot is huge in the US potato business, started in 1929 by an Idaho potato farmer, J. R. Simplot. A big breakthrough for the company was the development of the frozen french fry potato. As as far I know, Simplot is still the main french fry potato supplier to McDonald's--and that would be a lot of french fries.
    Last edited by wwhall; 02-15-2018 at 01:23 PM.

  4. #4
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    I would guess modern versions being computer controlled only run when required (like your kitchen refrigerator) and as such can make it across the country on one fill-up.

  5. #5
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    Odd thing is, and I am out watching trains quite often, I haven't seen a Simplot car in many, many months - at least in the Chicago area. I used to see them regularly, and Pete told me quite some time ago about his en-devour, so their absence has really stuck out.
    Neil

    Here at home, in the railroad mayhem capital of the world.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Don6218 View Post
    Something I found, may help if you haven't seen it already:
    Posted by CShaveRR on Friday, January 14, 2011 10:21 AM
    I think the MHW web information is slightly dated, Paul. The name is still Cryo-Trans, but their fleet has been 100-percent mechanically cooled for years now. Not even a museum piece left, as far as I know.
    There were other fleets of cryogenically-cooled reefers at one time (the J. R. Simplot cars come to mind), but I don't know what's happened to all of them (the newer JRSX cars, built as reefers, series 6000-6050 and 6100-6149, are still mostly in service, minus a few retirees; but the older 5000-series cars, rebuilt from SSW box cars, have been retired due to the age of the original equipment--from their Car Type Code, they haven't been rebuilt into mechanically-cooled cars)
    Thanks Don. These reskins are all in the 6000 - 6149 range but as none of them have external reefers (either the MSTS model or the real life versions) it got me wondering about how they were cooled and I recalled reading the article about CO2 "snow" some time ago, but that in turn led to my question about whether "reefer.sms" would still be appropriate.

    Quote Originally Posted by wwhall View Post
    Probably a key would be look to see if the cooling unit--engine, etc.--is on the end of the car. Those have evolved, too. A lot of the old PFE reefers, etc. used 2-cycle Detroit Diesels for power. They were noisy, as all "Screamin' Detroits" were. I believe the reefer "default" sound file in MSTS was based on the Detroit Diesel sound. A lot of the more modern units use air-cooled diesels, mostly likely Deutz engines? They're quite a bit quieter. I also think that the old Detroits were likely running anytime that the car was loaded, while the more modern diesels have sophisticated controls that start and stop the engine as needed. I believe that the latest generations of reefers use satellite communications to monitor location, temperature, and mechanical condition of the reefer and its cooling system. I would sometimes see solid reefer blocks stopped in Cheyenne when I lived there. You would hear the engines on the reefer units starting and stopping frequently. Most all of them also had a light on the refrigerator unit that would display green if all systems were working normally.
    These units don't have an external reefer Wade, or even an enclosed one like the 57ft reefers as far as I can tell. I'd have been inclined to think they were insulated boxcars but the F/L versions are all listed as reefer as are the details online.

    simplot.jpg


    Quote Originally Posted by wwhall View Post
    Nice looking reefers, by the way.
    Thanks! There's 30 in the set but not much for the purists unfortunately. There's only one free of graffiti and a couple of others with minimal amounts that could probably be painted out pretty easily, but for the most part they're covered. It's a real shame as the rust and weathering on them makes each one totally unique in appearance, but as always, the majority of good side on shots are shared by graffiti fans and not train fans, so you gotta get what you can get.

    Quote Originally Posted by qballbandit View Post
    Odd thing is, and I am out watching trains quite often, I haven't seen a Simplot car in many, many months - at least in the Chicago area. I used to see them regularly, and Pete told me quite some time ago about his en-devour, so their absence has really stuck out.
    For all my "wasted" hours on youtube, they're not something I've seen much of either mate. The odd few here and there in a manifest but for the most part I've assumed this series were starting to be pretty scarce by the time the youtube era got underway. That said though, I might be completely mistaken about that as there's no shortage of digital photo shots of them online....

    In lieu of anyone popping up with a definitive answer, I might just leave them as "GFW.sms" and if people want the reefer sounds, it's an easy fix.
    Cheers!
    Pete

  7. #7
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    I wonder if these are similar to other cryo-CO2 cars from that era? From what I understand they weren't very successful and the ones that were saved were converted to mechanical reefers..
    Jim

  8. #8

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    The refrigerator car business is interesting. A shortline with which I am familiar--the San Luis Central in the San Luis Valley in Colorado--used to field a large fleet of reefers that it acquired used and rebuilt, reporting mark "SLC." Some of those would interesting to model. Then, also in the San Luis Valley a couple of years ago, I saw a whole bunch of ex-Amtrak express reefers that had been sold to some private car line (I don't remember the reporting mark) that were being loaded with potatoes (the San Luis Valley is a very large potato producing area). Another interesting candidate for some repaints.

  9. #9
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    You might be interested in this if you haven't seen it before Wade.

    http://coastdaylight.com/trains/slc/reefers_slc.html
    Cheers!
    Pete

  10. #10

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    Peter, I have seen that. They're an interesting outfit. Some years back, I rode a mixed freight/passenger train (all of 8 passengers, I think) on the San Luis & Rio Grande from Alamosa to Monte Vista. On the way back to Alamosa, we stopped at Sugar Jct., where the SLRG interchanges with the San Luis Central, and picked up several cars, including some reefers. The SLC used to do a lot of contract car repair for other railroads and private car lines. I don't know whether or not they still do that.

    Those SLC cars do get around. 15+ years ago I was in Altoona, Pennsylvania watching an NS freight leaving town and there were two SLC reefers in the consist.

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