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Thread: Koppers Coking Ovens

  1. #1
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    Default Koppers Coking Ovens

    Hi,

    In progress views of models in Sketchup 8 of Koppers Coking ovens circa 1915, for the Seaboard By Products Coke plant at Kearney NJ.

    Seaboard ByProducts.jpgSeaboard ByProducts2.jpgSeaboard ByProducts3.jpgSeaboard ByProducts4.jpgSeaboard ByProducts5.jpg
    Making stuff that works, using outdated Software on outdated Hardware.

  2. #2
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    Default

    And a couple more:

    Seaboard ByProducts6.jpg

    a closeup of the oven hatch texture, worked up from a Jack Bouchard photo.

    Koppers12ftx55_2.jpg

    Doug Relyea
    Making stuff that works, using outdated Software on outdated Hardware.

  3. #3
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    So the apparatus on top, is that blowers or gas collectors? A LOT of money was made collecting and processing coke oven gases.
    Dave Nelson

    Seldom visiting, posting less often that that.

  4. #4
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    Hi,

    The piping is just the collectors. At this plant the blowers were located across from the collector well downstream from the ovens. Ammonia and tar separators, and primary coolers, as well as a second stage of tar and ammonia removal before reaching the exhausters or blowers.

    The primary purpose of this plant was to generate gas for the Public Service Corp of New Jersey. Coal (domestic anthracite and bituminous, as well as foreign bituminous) and Oil in, Gas for lighting, cooking and heating out. Coke and Tar out in railroad cars.

    The coke, tar and other by-products also provided revenue. Coke made it to Thomas Iron in Hokendauqua, Pa. Period magazines indicate coke was also barged out as heating fuel to the metropolitan area.

    Another reason I started on this, Bethlehem Steel had a similar operation in Hellertown, around the corner from South Bethlehem though I don't know yet if theirs were Koppers ovens. They sold gas to Bethlehem and Allentown.

    Doug Relyea
    Making stuff that works, using outdated Software on outdated Hardware.

  5. #5
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    Nice jobob .

    a modern mine or coal car unloader (cardumper), would you have a lot of work ??

    [QUOTE=drelyea;1930695]And a couple more:

    Seaboard ByProducts6.jpg
    Chimbica Dash8

  6. #6
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    Default

    Wow! That looks great. I looked up some information on these ovens and what a surprise, so much info and pictures. With this it could have the "Larry Car" moving back and forth as well as the Train with the quenching car(s).

    It is amazing how sometimes a single model can expand to include all sorts of extensions of itself and appear in so many ages of railroading from an active industry to a wasteland.

  7. #7
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    Hi Anderson,

    Thanks for the compliment. With all the custom industries still to be made for Tristate, I probably won't have time. There were 11 McMyler coal dumpers on the New Jersey side of New York Harbor, still to be made, and I expect there were variations there. I'm not sure if the NYSW's dumper is included, most McMylers, the catch pan had to be raised after dumping two cars to load the coal into the ship or barge. The NYSW's is being given as built tall enough to permit continuous dumping, stopping only to move the ship or barge as the location became full.

    Hi Don,

    Thanks. The only real change over time with these was the ovens got taller, doubling in height from 1915 to 1930 from 3 m tall to 6 m as new plants were built. If that animation was possible with Sketchup. The Larry car doing it's thing, the pusher car and guide car moving in unison, hot and still burning coke spilling into the quench car, the quench car with the billowing cloud of steam from the quench tower.
    And going on around this plant, 250 trains a day, into and out of Jersey City and Hoboken ( 1920; PRR, DL&W, Erie, NYS&W)

    Doug Relyea
    Making stuff that works, using outdated Software on outdated Hardware.

  8. #8
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    THANK YOU .

    One more time, your work is great



    [QUOTE=drelyea;1930747]Hi Anderson,

    Thanks for the compliment. With all the custom industries still to be made for Tristate, I probably won't have time. There were 11 McMyler coal dumpers on the New Jersey side of New York Harbor, still to be made, and I expect there were variations there. I'm not sure if the NYSW's dumper is included, most McMylers, the catch pan had to be raised after dumping two cars to load the coal into the ship or barge. The NYSW's is being given as built tall enough to permit continuous dumping, stopping only to move the ship or barge as the location became full.

    Hi Don,
    Chimbica Dash8

  9. #9
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    Hi,

    Couple more progress shots

    Koppers12ftx55_3.jpgKoppers12ftx55_4.jpg

    Doug Reyea
    Making stuff that works, using outdated Software on outdated Hardware.

  10. #10
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by drelyea View Post
    Hi,

    The primary purpose of this plant was to generate gas for the Public Service Corp of New Jersey. Coal (domestic anthracite and bituminous, as well as foreign bituminous) and Oil in, Gas for lighting, cooking and heating out. Coke and Tar out in railroad cars.

    Doug Relyea
    When did the community stop using coke gas for those things? At first I was guessing before WWI but then upon reflection I realized a lot of communities did not have access to NATGAS until the 50's -- I vaguely recall seeing coal delivered to homes in Chicago for heating in the late 50's early 60's so even tho NATGAS was available it took some years for people to convert their furnaces.

    But then, I know very little of what was going on with the east coast regarding such tings. What's the design-to date for the Tristate?
    Dave Nelson

    Seldom visiting, posting less often that that.

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