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Thread: WIN 7 & the Pirated software scam- personal update

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 1999
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    Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA.
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    Exclamation WIN 7 & the Pirated software scam- personal update

    I was searchng for a different answer in old posts and found this:

    https://www.trainsim.com/vbts/showth...Microsoft-scam

    and it occured to me that I should add that after a year or so of seeing the black screen and the message that I had a "not genuine" operating system, I decided to buy WIN 10 to run TRAINZ on and I ordered it and thought that I had nothing to loose so I tied to get a WIN 7 update. I really thought that I would at least get a message that I could not get updates because of the "not genuine" software problem or maybe an update would disable WIN7. What I did get was a bunch of updates and a blue desk-top with no more warnings that my software was "not genuine".

    It really instills confidence in a company, doesn't it!

    Wild Willy the Wacko

  2. #2

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    Window 7 won't work starting next year, that is what I have seen all over the internet that is why I decided to buy a new computer and install win 8.1 on my old desktop.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2010
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    Worksop, UK
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    1,924

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    Hi 1claire,
    I doubt that Windows 7 will stop working next year! Agreed that there will be no more updates/patches/fixes but you should still be able to use it and, with a good anti-virus, you should still be protected.

    Why go for Win 8.1? Unless you already had an unused copy, Windows 10 is much better, and it's up to date!!

    Cheers,
    Ged

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2010
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    FREE SUPPORT ends in January 2020 for Windows 7 (2023 for Windows 8.1). If nothing breaks in the hardware, the computer will keep working; the lack of support simply means any bugs and security issues won't be fixed. There are actually a fair number of XP computers still in use, even though support for that ended many years ago, though users of those computers are well-advised to keep them off of the internet even with antivirus (av makers have been gradually dropping support for XP too).

    Much modern software (even Firefox and Chrome) won't work with XP any more. Even Open Rails is likely to drop XP support sooner rather than later. So sticking with a Windows version that goes out of support can open other paths to hacking and malware as not only Windows but other software isn't patched any more. Still, the computer won't just stop working.

    You basically need to move to 10. There are caveats (especially: beware of graphics systems that are in "legacy" status for drivers), but Windows 10 works surprisingly well with older hardware especially if it was fairly high-grade for the time. But the support policies for consumer editions of Windows 10 have changed from the older versions - 10 years from a release date is no longer a thing. You have to stay on the (roughly) semi-annual feature update cycle because all support (including security patches) is limited to 18-24 months from the date a feature update is released. If something with your hardware (even fairly new stuff has been affected) becomes unsupported by the OEM, Windows can refuse to install a feature update which starts (by the time you know a new one isn't going to be installed) a 6-12 month clock for losing all support. IOW, with Windows 10, as with a cell phone, you have to budget for replacing a computer every 3-5 years; call it the Microsoft Tax. It's very likely that it will last longer, but especially with stuff like tablets and laptops you can't count on it (with desktops, there's a possibility of upgrading some individual parts that trigger Windows incompatibility) so you need the budget to replace at that interval.

    The panics about Windows 10 "spying" are just that: panics. Windows 10 does do a lot more data collection than previous versions did (though a lot of that has been retrofitted to 7 and 8.1 over the last couple of years). They seem in some ways to be emulating Google (Android is a true privacy nightmare!). But much of it is controllable through settings, and a bit more through Group Policy and the Registry accessed via some 3rd-party tools. Windows 10 is somewhat maintenance intensive because settings need to be re-examined after every feature update. Then, of course, the "oh no it's restarting again" - Windows updates have always required restart, but unless you fix settings Windows 10 might do it automatically which might interrupt other things you're doing. But it's not difficult to keep up with. The upside of the mandatory updates is that security issues do get patched fairly quickly.

    Bottom line, as at the top line: if you're using Windows 7 (or even 8.1) regardless of how you got it, and want to keep using Windows after January 2020/2023, you need to move to Windows 10 and learn how to manage it. If you buy a new computer, you will have to use Windows 10; backdating to 7 no longer works on modern hardware.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
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    I'll wait until what comes after 10. Preferably by then, as big tech data collection loses political ground due to events happening within the current 'wild west' data collection approach, consumers will have bestowed upon them by legislative bodies a newfound choice to opt out of any and all data collection short of the current approach of simply having to unplug or fight the perpetual permissions fight.

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