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Thread: New Windows 10 Issue

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    411

    Default New Windows 10 Issue

    Found a new glitch with my W10 install.

    I cannot find a program that will jump to a new location in the RE. In the past I've always used RE-Explore2, which worked great in XP and 7. With 10, it installs and opens fine, but will not jump. It does not alter the lat/long entries in the Camera window, and nothing happens.

    I tried Joker, found it in the library, also has a jump feature, no go with it either.

    And just for the sake of testing, I tried jumping with the Alignment Utility, same results, no movement.

    Anybody have any success moving around in the RE with W10? I can work around by changing the start tile info in the .trk file, since I generally work on a given area, but being able to jump is a lot more convenient.

    Thanks,
    Jeff

    Nothing is foolproof to a sufficiently-talented fool.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    818

    Default

    Win10 has lots of protections to keep applications from affecting each other, especially if you run them as a normal user.

    Make sure both MSTS + the RE, as well as any utilities are all set in their properties to "Run as administrator". This generally lets them run free of limitations.

    Also make sure they all run from outside of any "protected" directories -- no "Program Files" folders, not even for small utilities.

    There are also some instances where antivirus detects an application modifying another's data in memory and stops the action. It is something that malware can do. However your antivirus works, make sure that MSTS and all related utilities are excluded both from file scanning and from run-time (sometimes called "live" or "real-time") scanning. A lot of AV software makes you put the same exceptions in two (or more) different places to tell the AV "Hands Off!"

    My usual solution to keeping AV out of games and technical utilities that tend to tweak-off the AV, is to use a system of categories and subfolders. If I install a new MSTS utility it goes in D:\MSTS Utilities\<Name-of-new-application>. Then I can just wildcard the AV exceptions as "exclude D:\MSTS Utilities\*" so that I can just keep adding software and not have to create more AV exceptions.


    MSTS-Roundhouse

    With Open Rails and ZDSimulator
    Info

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    411

    Default

    Eric, you are a genius.

    Running as Administrator solved the problem. I had set MSTS to run as administrator, but didn't set other applications to do so as well.

    This is something I need to keep in mind; I'm so used to working with older operating systems that I don't think about all the possible restrictions of the new stuff.

    At work I provide tech support for a computer system the Navy uses on board ships. This system was just recently upgraded to W7, and not all ships have that. Many are still XP or 2000, and there are even a couple still running NT!

    This is my first W10 computer, and I'm learning new stuff every day.

    Thanks a million!
    Jeff

    Nothing is foolproof to a sufficiently-talented fool.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    818

    Default

    Glad it's working now!

    I've learned that Win10 just continued the same path of security limitations that Win7 (and Vista) started. Basically, for older software that wasn't designed to work with it, it's actually pretty easy to get most things working, especially if they're fairly simple programs and utilities.


    • If you don't want Windows to impose "security" or limitations on it, don't install it in a "Program Files" folder. This is especially important if the program edits its own configuration files or makes/allows changes to the files that live in its own folder(s). The MSTS editors are poster children for this behavior...
    • To avoid the above, make your own category folders on the root level of the hard drive, like "Train Simulators", "Games", etc. and install your software there. It just means not taking the default path when the installer runs.
    • A lot of older applications also expect to do whatever they need to do in memory when they run. Set their properties to "Run as Administrator" to make sure Windows will let them do that.
    • For games and simulators that need largely free reign on the system, run them from an account on the computer that's an Administrator. That will keep you free of user rights issues. Yes, it's not ideal from a security standpoint, but you need to run Win98-era software in a Win-98-like environment. Also, since you're running software from folders you created as I mentioned above, there's never any question your account has rights to them.


    Doing those things will resolve a lot of issues with Win10 and old software. Once in a while you might need to set one of the "Compatibility" tab properties for one of the older operating systems, but usually its just permissions restrictions that you can sidestep just by staying out of Win10's restricted folders and using admin rights wisely.


    MSTS-Roundhouse

    With Open Rails and ZDSimulator
    Info

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