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Thread: Passenger Car Testing

  1. #1

    Default Passenger Car Testing

    3DTS_UP_LtwtCoach_5468 says that a modern lightweight passenger car weighs 65 tons.
    If so how can they be "strong and heavy" to widthstand colissions with other trains.
    I googled about it and it only said passenger cars weigh 65 tons and the "FRA requires them to be strong and heavy."
    If that is the case, I don't think 65 tons of steel could possibly widthstand a hit with up to 15,000 tons.
    LONG LIVE BNSF 8010!
    ALL HAIL MSTS!

  2. #2

    Default

    65 tons is heavy for a passenger car.

    But the FRA does not specify that they must be heavy - the weight is just an (unfortunate) consequence of the FRA buff strength regulations. FRA demands the cars be able to resist a crash of 800,000 lbs force (400 tons). [It's a little more complicated, but we can keep things simple here.] It's not 15,000 tons though; somebody might have confused pounds and tons, or been thinking in metric.

    However, the FRA's standards did not apply when Union Pacific ordered that car and it's operation today would be grandfathered in.

    Anyway, the answer here is that yes, 65 tons (or even much less) can withstand a much larger force in a crash . . . if it is designed well. (There was a recent problem with an Amtrak order that was designed to meet the standard but could not because the welds were failing).

    Christopher

  3. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by conductorchris View Post
    65 tons is heavy for a passenger car.

    But the FRA does not specify that they must be heavy - the weight is just an (unfortunate) consequence of the FRA buff strength regulations. FRA demands the cars be able to resist a crash of 800,000 lbs force (400 tons). [It's a little more complicated, but we can keep things simple here.] It's not 15,000 tons though; somebody might have confused pounds and tons, or been thinking in metric.

    However, the FRA's standards did not apply when Union Pacific ordered that car and it's operation today would be grandfathered in.

    Anyway, the answer here is that yes, 65 tons (or even much less) can withstand a much larger force in a crash . . . if it is designed well. (There was a recent problem with an Amtrak order that was designed to meet the standard but could not because the welds were failing).

    Christopher
    Chris I said "15,000 tons" because I was thinking of a heavy freight train hitting it.
    LONG LIVE BNSF 8010!
    ALL HAIL MSTS!

  4. #4

    Default

    It is unlikely in a derailment that the entire force of the freight train would impact a passenger car.

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