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Thread: Camas Prairie RR under construction

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 1999
    Location
    Jacksonville,, FL, USA.
    Posts
    3,800

    Cool Camas Prairie RR under construction

    Colleagues,

    Most of the Camas Prairie was built in the first decade of the 20th century, a time when a
    lot of railroad lines, many now abandoned, were constructed. The Milwaukee Road
    Pacific Extension was built between 1905 & 1909 for example, as was the Virginian,
    and most of the Clinchfield.

    I have always been fascinated by this relatively small railroad, totaling only about 250
    miles in all, so I decided several years ago to do it in MSTS. As I often do, I generated
    the files, extracted the scenery, and put in a marker files from UsaPhotomaps -- and
    then put it on the shelf so to speak. So I got it back out, dusted it off, and have laid
    track from Riparia,WA through Lewiston,ID to Stites, ID which was the original line,
    and also the branch from Orofino to Headquarters, ID which was mainly a logging
    operation. Now I am working on the branch from Spalding to Grangeville which is
    the most interesting of the lot. Also since Riparia did not seem like a good place to
    end it, I have extended it over the UP (UP & NS were joint owners) to Ayer, Jct. and
    yes, I will include a few miles of the UP including the Joso viaduct.

    The line has been referred to as the "railroad on stilts" because there are literally
    dozens of timber trestles and only one steel viaduct, a 250' plus structure over
    Lawyers Creek about 1100 feet in length. The line climbs Lapwai Canyon in a
    southeasterly direction and when it reaches the box end of the canyon, it then
    doubles back on a 10 degree curve, mostly in a tunnel, and then climbs back
    in a northwestward direction for a few miles before doubling east up another
    canyon to reach the top of the wheat fields near Reubens, ID. Some years ago
    one of the big timber trestles burned and that was the end of this part of the
    railroad with the lower part of Lapwai Canyon now being mostly a parking lot
    for other folks' railroad cars. Tracks are gone, or "going" beyond the burned
    trestle and most of the Headquarters branch line is gone too. Scenery will be
    sparse because -- well it is pretty sparse around these parts except for trees.

    I am also showing the layout at Headquarters, and yes to leave this place you
    must negotiate a single switch back.

    As an aside, I don't sculpt the terrain until I install the bridges. That makes
    it easier to get them aligned correctly and to spot where they should go. Where
    the train is now, will be a side-hill cut, or shelf. Also, from Culdesac, ID to the
    top, the gradient is 3% compensated. This means it is reduced on curves,
    but we have no way of knowing how much, so I take measurements from Google
    Earth & use the average gradient between points. Then I adjust the gradient
    up or down a little to match check points, usually within +- 1/2 meter.

    J. H. Sullivan
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Post Falls, ID
    Posts
    1,054

    Default

    Hi Jerry,

    Excellent, I know it's a long way coming but highly looking forward to this one. I recognized Headquarters right away. By the way, many railroads, including NP, normally used 0.04% per degree of curvature for compensation. So a 10 degree curve on a 3% compensated would be 2.6%.
    ~Sean Kelly~

    MRL Mullan Pass for ORTS
    https://www.trainsimulations.net/Pro...LLAN_ORTS.HTML

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Onalaska, Wa
    Posts
    72

    Default

    Sweet another Wa route!

    Sent from my SM-G988U using Tapatalk

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 1999
    Location
    Jacksonville,, FL, USA.
    Posts
    3,800

    Default

    That much change would probably be impossible to duplicate in MSTS. One thing I liked about RailWorks was
    that the track, curvature, gradient, etc. was almost infinitely variable which allow smooth transitions in vertical
    curve. In this route, the grade changes are more abrupt than in any other I have done. I have used changes
    of .05 in 5 meters, although most changes are .05 in 10 meters. As of now, I have just turned the loop at the
    top of Lapwai Canyon and are headed back northwest, climbing at 3% as I go - actually about 2.9% to
    account for the compensation.

    J. H. Sullivan

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 1999
    Location
    Jacksonville,, FL, USA.
    Posts
    3,800

    Cool Upper End of Lapwai Canyon

    Colleagues,

    Given that there are several 14 degree curves at the head of the canyon, I reduced
    the grade slightly to "compensate". It is still a beast. Here are 4 more images.
    I'm just using default stock in the test activity but in the later years, the correct
    stock would have been GP-7 or GP-9 engine, either UP or NP and most trains had
    a caboose. At the very end, the line was a subsidiary of the WATCO group of
    shortlines I believe and operated under the name of Camas Prairie RailNet.

    The engines in this default consist are far too heavy for the wood trestles used
    on the line.

    Just ahead of the train in the last image (where the bridge is seen below) is
    tunnel #2 which was daylighted several years ago, and just beyond that is the
    trestle which burned and doomed the line to extinction about a decade ago.
    Including the daylighted tunnel, there were 7 on the line. All except the loop
    tunnel were short. The Craig Mountain RR, and the Nez Perce RR will be
    included. These were short feeders. The CM was a lumber outfit, and the NPRR
    was agricultural.

    Passenger service on the line(s) ended in the 1950s and the last train on the
    Grangeville line was a NP DoodleBug. Anyone want to create one?

    Jerry Sullivan
    Attached Images Attached Images

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 1999
    Location
    Jacksonville,, FL, USA.
    Posts
    3,800

    Default

    Colleagues,

    I could use a little help from anyone familiar with the area. I am including the UP line from just west of
    Ayer Jct., up and across the JOSO Viaduct, thence along the Palouse River & past Palouse Falls to a
    point about a mile northeast of the UP bridge over the Palouse River. As such, I have no problem if
    someone wanted to take my route, even before it is released, and extract that portion of the UP for
    their own route, but there is a slight problem.

    Literally dozens of images exist of the JOSO Viaduct and so I don't expect any serious problem
    creating it with TSM. But the bridge over the Palouse River. I have no clue about that one. I've
    never seen images of it and it appears in Google Earth to be some type of deck truss, perhaps
    a arch span. So, do any of you have images of this bridge?

    Jerry Sullivan

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Post Falls, ID
    Posts
    1,054

    Default

    IMG_7574.jpg

    ParkBridge.JPG

    HiI Jerry,

    I've hiked Palouse Canyon countless times. I'm Assuming this is the bridge in question, about 2 miles north of Palouse Falls. First view is looking towards the west, so we are seeing the east side of the bridge. Second view (with the UP engines) is looking towards the east. The spur just north of the bridge is known as Park.

    P.S. Myself and others have numerous other photos on railpictures.net in this canyon, if you search "Palouse Canyon". I can provide you with some additional photos of this bridge if you don't find them.
    Last edited by PerryPlatypus; 05-19-2020 at 04:57 PM.
    ~Sean Kelly~

    MRL Mullan Pass for ORTS
    https://www.trainsimulations.net/Pro...LLAN_ORTS.HTML

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 1999
    Location
    Jacksonville,, FL, USA.
    Posts
    3,800

    Default

    Thanks Sean, those two will do just fine for the bridge, but I will poke around some more and see what I
    can find. This bridge is unusual in that in the 2nd image, the left end is suspended from the top Chord
    while the right end has the lower Chord resting on a pillar. Rather unusual, and makes it asymmetrical
    too. I'll be looking at other images to see about clipping out a bit to use for terrain texture as you have
    to admit that is a unusual area. The rock appears to be weathered basalt, volcanic in nature.

    As a docent on the C&TS, I remind passengers as we pass Lava Tank that we are crossing an ancient
    lava flow from Los Mojes, a small dormant volcano about 5 miles to the northwest, and then I make the
    remark, "So you would have found things uncomfortably warm around here 35M years or so ago.".
    After St. Helens popped off in 1980, no serious geologist will ever call a volcano "extinct".

    Jerry

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