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Thread: HELP! ANOTHER Seagate Drive has let me down.

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick-MONON View Post
    The 2 I lost this year on win 10 was 2 WD 2TB hdd's with in 1 month of each other.
    I recovered the data with EaseUS software. It even kept the same file structure.
    Thanks Rick I'll look into that.

    The frustration is that once a drive has corrupted it's kind of difficult to have faith in reformatting it and reusing it? Illogical of course because a new disc's reliability is no more certain than the reformatted old one? Of course mechanical failures are a different story as far as reuse is concerned but they can happen to any disc
    Geoff
    Dorset - near The Swanage Railway.
    UK

  2. #12
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    They also have trial software. You can use the software to see if it can find any data. Then you can look at thumbs of the data before you buy it so you can restore it.
    Rick

    http:\\mononrr.com

    MONON-2


  3. #13

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    I used the Seagate tools ages ago, and had moderate success, but still lost some data.

    Never trust a drive beyond three years. All drives will eventually fail, even solid states. Always back up in two different places -- I use portables as well as paid online backup with Dropbox.

    Which reminds me, it's time to proactively replace the one in my seven year old Alienware... Going with SSD this time around, but stuck with a mechanical drive last time because of cost.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by eolesen View Post
    I used the Seagate tools ages ago, and had moderate success, but still lost some data.
    Thanks for the feedback Eric.

    I'm not holding my breath for total success and most stuff is already backed up. Trouble is it took me most of yesterday to back-up the back-up!!! As you say below in at LEAST two places and that's to 3 if you include the original drive. The BIG frustration is remembering all the odds and sods you downloaded and installed so even a view of the contents would be useful even if the files themselves are corrupted or inaccessible.

    I guess some regular screenshots of file manager would be an additional insurance. At least I wouldn't be fretting that I'd lost irreplaceable stuff

    There was a great little utility that worked on older OS's that allowed you to view ALL folders and their relative sizes. It opened up to shown all subfolders and sizes too. I seem to remember there was a newer version that worked with newer OS's called "Everything"?

    At least with these images you could see what was not backed up and if that was re-downloadable you can just reformat the drive and re-install stuff. It's a toss up as to what is quicker? Rescue the old stuff or start again with back-up and reinstalling stuff?

    Quote Originally Posted by eolesen View Post
    Never trust a drive beyond three years. All drives will eventually fail, even solid states. Always back up in two different places -- I use portables as well as paid online backup with Dropbox.
    Online is a good point and something I haven't used despite having free storage from a number of sources including my ISP. Trouble is you can end up doing more work for your PC than your PC does for you ?!

    Quote Originally Posted by eolesen View Post
    Which reminds me, it's time to proactively replace the one in my seven year old Alienware... Going with SSD this time around, but stuck with a mechanical drive last time because of cost.
    SSD prices have certainly come down but bad reviews about failures and mythology about their performance hasn't helped them. As for your 7 yr old Alienware I'm slightly staggered at how old my "NEW" box actually is.... ...if it ain't broke, don't fix it?
    Geoff
    Dorset - near The Swanage Railway.
    UK

  5. #15
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    ....so hours of wasted time later I finally (having had to purchase another smaller USB stick and a SATA USB ssd Connector cable - the latter in the STUPID idea that I might save files from the old disk ) I download some software from Seagate to test the drive. The "Tools" software told me there was a problem with the Seagate Drive .......seeth....... "No shit Sherlock!" ....funnily enough I knew that. So it then tells me to download a bootable file that contains the tools as well but the idea being the PC BOOTS from the USB stick and allows the software to run tests and fixes (?) from the USB stick.

    So what's the problem? Downloaded it several times and everytime I try to install it on the USB stick it says the installer is corrupted!

    I never had much faith in this anyway as most of my previous attempts to save data from corrupted discs have not worked ....BUT I was determined to keep an open mind, a "positive" outlook, be patient, RTFM etc.etc.

    Seems like I'd have saved a lot of time plugging in the new SSD and biting the bullet of collecting stuff I'd lost all over again.

    One thing I have learnt, over years of working as a technician, is that when a job REALLY hacks you off..... Just walk away and do something else. ONLY go back to it when you've got past the wanting to hit it with a hammer stage!!! LOL!

    Might try some other utilities first because a quick Google shows I'm not the first to have issues with this download. Sadly nothing I read so far had any explanation because folk either got it working or ...just couldn't get it to work.

    So Seagate that's twice you've failed me. There ain't gonna be a third time
    Geoff
    Dorset - near The Swanage Railway.
    UK

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by lateagain View Post
    ...One thing I have learnt, over years of working as a technician, is that when a job REALLY hacks you off..... Just walk away and do something else. ONLY go back to it when you've got past the wanting to hit it with a hammer stage!!! LOL!...
    in other words, the ever reliable brogan maintenance
    Cheers, Gerry
    It's my railroad and I'll do what I want! Historically accurate attitude of US Railroad Barons.
    Forever, ridin' drag in railroad knowledge.


  7. #17
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    Some years ago Gartner Group did a study of data center and desktop hard drive longevity. The data showed the big increase in failure rates, on average, occurred after 5 years of use - not 3 years. The big surprise from the study was that always-on compared to turn-off-every-day-when-done made absolutely no difference. The mean time between failure was consistent for both operating modes.

    The Seagate vs. Western Digital anecdotes are somewhat misleading. It's certain manufactured batches, drive model "runs", that turn out to be bad with high failure rates, no doubt from what parts were used when a particular model was made - or how or IF it was ever tested before it left the factory.

    Since we're all moving to SSDs as the prices continue to shrink, note that a few days ago I had a second incident at work where an SSD had complete failure - after only 2.5 years of use. It was a cheap Edge Tech Corp 500GB SSD. A few years ago, the first SSD failure I encountered was, indeed, also an Edge SSD. A replacement PNY brand 500GB SSD cost a whopping $39.00 ... !
    Last edited by ftldave; 10-16-2020 at 07:55 PM. Reason: fix txt
    - FTLDave

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  8. #18
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    You want some real world stats, try

    https://www.backblaze.com/b2/hard-drive-test-data.html

    Stats on 140,000 drives.
    Cheers
    Derek

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by derekmorton View Post
    You want some real world stats, try

    https://www.backblaze.com/b2/hard-drive-test-data.html

    Stats on 140,000 drives.
    LOL!! Ploughing through that lot is a (weird sort of) hobby in itself?!

    Well all that really shows is that Dave's second point above about failures being in specific models/batches is correct.

    It also shows just how many different models and types of drive each manufacturer makes, the wide difference in their costs and just how massively the capacity of discs has increased?

    It also broadly APPEARS to show a slightly higher failure rate amongst Seagate drives? .....BUT without a more detailed analysis and comparison of all the data that would be hard to substantiate.

    I have to say that over the years (more than 30 years now) I've been involved with PC's the number of "internal HDDs" I've had fail is pretty small and dozens have run faultlessly for WAY beyond 3 or 5 years. Certainly the first Seagate that died on me was shown in a quick Google Search to be part of a specific batch that scores of folk had posted complaints about.

    The one thing I don't get is the passion for BIG capacity drives? The bigger the drive the greater the damage it's failure will cause?

    Decent MB's in Desktops (I'm not a fan of Laptops) have plenty of connectors for drives and the case I'm using at the moment has 7 bays for drives (9 if you include a couple of optical drive bays) so why put all your eggs in one basket?

    Luckily I've kept my old box running Windows 7 and so much of the stuff that was on the newer box failed drive was copied over to the new box. The big drag about these failures is not knowing exactly what I've lost. It usually come to light when you try and use something only to find an error message pop up.

    I'm kind of resigned to not getting the data back but the massive frustration is that the disc shows up as being "physically present and correct" so it's merely a software issue that's preventing seeing the files. I'll not give up just yet. Still suggestions above to try out and I'll not give up on the USB boot option without some "words" with seagate's support.

    I'll post any successes.... It might just help someone else.
    Geoff
    Dorset - near The Swanage Railway.
    UK

  10. #20

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    Indeed, batches matter. When I ran a data center, we specifically avoided buying replacement drives in bulk to reduce our exposure to a batch issue. It doesn't mean we avoided having a supply depot stockpiling drives from the same batch, but at least the odds were somewhat more in our favor than if we'd bought a dozen drives from the same supplier.

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