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Thread: No response from 3D Trains

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Lubec ME USA
    Posts
    313

    Default No response from 3D Trains

    Last week I ordered the Amtrak Pacific Surfliner passenger set from 3D Trains. I have yet to get the download or even get an acknowledgement that they received the order. Are they still active or did my $10 go into a black hole? I did get a receipt from PayPal so I know the order went in.

    Jon

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Worksop, UK
    Posts
    2,140

    Default

    Hi Jon,
    At least, as you used PayPal, you should get your money back if the download link isn't forth-coming!

    However, have you checked your Junk or SPAM folder for their reply?

    Cheers,
    Ged

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 1999
    Location
    Huntsville, AL
    Posts
    4,545

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jonpd View Post
    Last week I ordered the Amtrak Pacific Surfliner passenger set from 3D Trains. I have yet to get the download or even get an acknowledgement that they received the order. Are they still active or did my $10 go into a black hole? I did get a receipt from PayPal so I know the order went in.

    Jon
    If your 3dTrains forum user name is betacentaure

    Then your forum status is now "Valued Customer" so you now have access to the part of the forum to download your purchase.

    If betacentaure

    is not your forum name there, have you responded to the email recognizing your purchase and sent an email to 3dTrains to inform them of your forum username so that your status could be updated allowing you access to the download area?

    Just now found a jonpd member of the 3dTrains forum. User status ie "Valued Customer" You should find your purchase to download at:

    Last edited by crstagg; 10-26-2020 at 01:24 PM.
    Charles

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Lubec ME USA
    Posts
    313

    Default

    Thanks Charles. I was able to log in and find the download.

    However it seems to need a keycode from an email to activate it and since they never sent me an email I still have to wait for them to respond before I can use the download. Still crickets from 3DTrains.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 1999
    Location
    Huntsville, AL
    Posts
    4,545

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jonpd View Post
    Thanks Charles. I was able to log in and find the download.

    However it seems to need a keycode from an email to activate it and since they never sent me an email I still have to wait for them to respond before I can use the download. Still crickets from 3DTrains.
    I think those are automated messages, so you had best check your spam and trash folders.
    Charles

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    UP's dead Santa Barbara Sub
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    913

    Default

    How complicated does that need to be?? Just my .02

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 1999
    Location
    Jacksonville,, FL, USA.
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    3,852

    Default

    Curt,
    Others,

    I am seeing things like this almost any time I order something on line, as from Ebay or Amazon. I would
    suspect it is a on going effort to reduce fraud. My bank, for example, more recently went to a 2-step
    log in. I have had LifeLock for some years, but LL does not handle 2-step logins so it is now unable to
    monitor my transactions. However, the bank now has a similar service for free, so I will probably drop
    LL. If I log into my bank, it accepts the first step, but then sends a one-time code, good for a short period
    of time, typically 30 minutes, to my registered email address which I then have to key in to the bank
    login as a 2nd step.
    In another situation involving a 401K, I can only log in, also 2-step, if I am logging in from a registered
    device. I assume the IP address is used to identify the device. Try it from something else and I have to
    go through all kinds of hoops to eventually get in. Again, security - it is getting to be more troublesome
    but it is there to protect us-----.

    J. H. Sullivan
    (aka landnrailroader)

  8. #8

    Default

    These aren't companies staffed 24/7. People have jobs that come first, and like it or not, selling digital trains on the internet is still a hobby.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Pacific Time
    Posts
    934

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by crstagg View Post
    I think those are automated messages, so you had best check your spam and trash folders.
    Good point. Check your spam and trash email folders. Also, if you (like me, for one email account) have another redirection along the line, you may have to check the scanner for THAT email as well. In my case, it's a professional organization and, unless I'm responding to a periodic notice of things held, I have to log in to that and go to the email checker. Once there, I can whitelist and recover items.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Pacific Time
    Posts
    934

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by landnrailroader View Post
    Curt,
    Others,

    I am seeing things like this almost any time I order something on line, as from Ebay or Amazon. I would
    suspect it is a on going effort to reduce fraud. My bank, for example, more recently went to a 2-step
    log in. I have had LifeLock for some years, but LL does not handle 2-step logins so it is now unable to
    monitor my transactions. However, the bank now has a similar service for free, so I will probably drop
    LL. If I log into my bank, it accepts the first step, but then sends a one-time code, good for a short period
    of time, typically 30 minutes, to my registered email address which I then have to key in to the bank
    login as a 2nd step.
    In another situation involving a 401K, I can only log in, also 2-step, if I am logging in from a registered
    device. I assume the IP address is used to identify the device. Try it from something else and I have to
    go through all kinds of hoops to eventually get in. Again, security - it is getting to be more troublesome
    but it is there to protect us-----.

    J. H. Sullivan
    (aka landnrailroader)
    What I see is that everybody wants 2-factor authentication if the site has even remotely sensitive information. It's near-universal if money is involved, as with banks, stocks, credit cards. I usually have them send the short-time code in a text to my cell phone - more reliable than sending an email. So far, I've only found one site that accepts my Yubikey (an encryption stick that plugs into a USB port) as a second factor. A few (like Microsoft and my work computer) use codes sent to an "authenticator" app on the phone - MS and Google both publish such an app.

    It's a good move from a security standpoint. Almost nobody has a good enough password, or changes it often enough, because it's such a pain to remember it. If somebody guesses or steals your password, 2FA gives them another hurdle to get over, that they might not be able to surmount if you use your phone or a Yubikey-like device for the second factor.

    Then, registering your computer. "Registration" is often based on a cookie or other volatile data, that gets deleted every time I shut down the browser (for privacy reasons). A few seem to use other data, perhaps some hash of information about the machine and software, that stays around. For instance, a couple of banks I use won't ask me for the 2nd factor unless the browser version changes; unfortunately, Firefox seems to do updates about once a month if not more often, so the 2nd factor demand is fairly frequent.

    At one time, I used to have the 2FA code emailed to me. Seldom do that any more. If a bad guy has my computer and login info, they can also probably look at my email. Better to use a separate device.

    Finally, I try to use a different password for every account, and usually a different username as well. Yes, it's a pain in the neck. At one time, all that used to fit on an index card (paper password manager). I have way too many now. So I use Keepass - a free, open source password manager that lets me remember one password - for the manager - and look up the others within it, then copy it (with a short expiration time in the clipboard) to whatever's asking for it. There are other similar programs, but I like this one. Then, I keep copies of the (encrypted) database file for the manager on each computer, synchronized through a copy on my personal Onedrive. The software is available for nearly every platform - I have it on Windows and Linux computers, and my Android phone.

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