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Thread: Best Newbie Reference

  1. #1

    Default Best Newbie Reference

    Hi,
    I have TSW2. I have completed all of the Sand Patch training modules and done the first yard switching scenario.
    Though I completed the yard switching scenario with a decent score, I doubt I did much of anything right. Anyway, now that I know more or less what this Sim is about- I need to learn how to work it. The downloadable manual from the Steam site is slightly more in depth than what is already available inside the game, but not what I need.

    Here are things that I wonder about. Hopefully these may let someone know what to recommend for me to go read:
    1) what is a consist?
    2) who is the person sitting in the engine with me? What are they doing there, besides glaring at me when I come in and out of the door?
    3) Do I have to stay in the engine that is pointing backwards or can I go get in the one pointing in the direction of travel? (see question 4)
    4) As the train gets longer, I can no longer see the state of the track switches (red green). All of the views are from the back of the train. Is this because I'm in the backwards engine?
    5) Is there a map legend? I'm especially interested to know if the switch designation indicates the state of the switch or not. ( this is important since I can only view from the rear of the train. )
    6) How can I view from the front of the train? It takes forever to get out and walk to a switch to see which way it is set.
    7) Can the person sitting in the engine with me be enticed to do useful work? Like perhaps, get out and go switch the track switches?

    So, that is pretty much where I am at.
    Any non-smart a$$ suggestions will be greatly appreciated.
    That is not to say I don't enjoy a clever smart a$$ from time to time. Clever is the key word.
    Which book do I need?

    TIA,
    --John

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    This is probably the best newbie guide available for TSW2 (please note, I don't own the game myself)

    https://steamcommunity.com/sharedfil...?id=2204163649

    1. Your consist is your train, it "consists" of your locomotives and cars.
    2. In a North American train, that is your conductor. In reality (as in your question 7) they are there to supervise and assist the engineer (driver) with a lot of tasks involving the operation of the train, including coupling, shunting and switching.

    The others relate specifically to the simulator itself, so I can't answer them. Hope this helps get you started, at least.

  3. #3

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    @John
    3) Do I have to stay in the engine that is pointing backwards or can I go get in the one pointing in the direction of travel? (see question
    4) As the train gets longer, I can no longer see the state of the track switches (red green). All of the views are from the back of the train. Is this because I'm in the backwards engine?

    Using the "#3" you can use an outside view cam. once in that view you can use the direction arrows to move cam and fast move by holding "shift" plus a direction arrow. clicking "three key" twice will give you a second cam. you could use one at rear of consist and be in position of conductor, then enable hud via "F1" to control the lead engine. This simulates rl as the conductor would be in radio contact with engineer and would be his eyes. the other cam you can move any where along the consist for coupling and uncoupling or just for getting some cool views.
    By clicking "#1" will put you back in engineers seat. Note to access these views you have to be in engineers seat. Another
    helpful view is free cam which is "#8" you can move anywhere using arrow keys. with all these outside views you can manipulate switches and pin pullers/handbrakes. there is also "#2" which is a cam locked on loco or by clicking '#2" twice it will put you at rear of train and it rotates around car. you can change cars but I don't recall how as I don't use it.
    You can avoid the long walk to back engine of a multi unit lash up to set the other engines by sitting in lead loco seat then hit lft "cntrl " plus the "+ or -' and you will be put in the next engines seat- you will have to play with that to see how it works
    Map view is accessed via "#9" key witch also provides a a way to change turnouts via clicking on said turnout and you will see how it is aligned by mousing over and seeing what direction the blue line goes
    As for the other person in cab they are useless, they don't do anything.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by metalangel View Post
    This is probably the best newbie guide available for TSW2 (please note, I don't own the game myself)

    https://steamcommunity.com/sharedfil...?id=2204163649
    Hi MetalAngel,
    Thanks. Which Train Sim (if any) do you use/prefer?
    I'm done with TSW2. I'm sure it's great for some folks, but really just not my style.
    Watcha ?

    --John

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rebrecs View Post
    Hi MetalAngel,
    Thanks. Which Train Sim (if any) do you use/prefer?
    I'm done with TSW2. I'm sure it's great for some folks, but really just not my style.
    Watcha ?

    --John
    It really depends on what you want out of a train sim, as they're fairly specialized.

    I like Run8, because it provides the best simulation of North American railroad operations. Not just driving, but also shunting, humping, trimming, and dispatching. It's best played on a multiplayer server, though: the singleplayer requires a lot of work in the current version, the AI only knows how to drive a route you've set for it. It lets you jump down and walk around in a cruder version of that functionality from TSW2. It can display massive yards filled with railcars, and you can make a 10,000ft train with distributed power and carefully work your way up a challenging gradient if you feel up to it.

    For pure driving, I like Diesel Railcar Simulator. It is mostly focused on first-generation British DMUs (most of which have manual gearboxes) but also has a diesel-electric locomotive and a little shunter to drive. Most of the activities you drive from A to B, calling at stations along the way. The sounds and sense of movement are fantastic. Those old units bobbed around like crazy at speed, and you really feel it as you get to 50 or 60mph.

    For getting my hands dirty, a challenge, and driving a steam locomotive, I like Derail Valley. It's a little like Euro Truck Simulator 2 in that you are freelance driver, picking up orders to delivery specific cargo from from one place to another. It was originally designed for VR (it works fine with keyboard and mouse) and that means you use your hands to do EVERYTHING. Fasten couplers, attach hoses, open valves, shovel coal, fill water, flip breakers... The map is mountainous and challenging, and you slowly earn licences to pull longer trains or drive different locomotives. You have to assemble your train, drive it to the destination, drop the cars in the correct tracks, and service your engine.

    There's other sims too that I don't know as much about as I haven't used them as much, someone else can speak to their merits: OpenRails is a free MS Train Sim-compatible sim with a ton of support for add-ons, Trainz has the best route builder mode there is (the driving isn't as great), BVE is very old but has a lot of routes available too, and there's Train Simulator 2021, which is the predecessor/sister product to TSW2.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by metalangel View Post
    It really depends on what you want out of a train sim, as they're fairly specialized.
    Gosh,
    Well you have a career waiting for you in media if you ever want - objective reviews are almost non-existent these days. Most magazines are morphing more and more into reviews that read like Facebook posts. Thank YOU.

    The only so called games I own, and have ever experienced (prior to getting TSW2) are Flight Simulators. Thankfully, they run like Simulators more so than games. I don't care about achievements or gaining level 10 or making points or winning anything. I care about operating the (in this case Train) and learning as much as I can about how it all works, using the best simulated systems available. The systems (train controls, yards, tracks, etc) in TSW2 seem ok but the game aspect of it is unbearable.

    I like what you said about Run8, and will check it out. MultiPlayer sounds interesting too. I know what that includes regarding Flight Sim. Cannot yet visualize what it means in Trains. Sounds fun.

    Thanks again for taking the time to be verbose and objective.

    --John

  7. #7
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    Youtube is a great reference to see many of the sims in action.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rebrecs View Post
    Gosh,
    Well you have a career waiting for you in media if you ever want - objective reviews are almost non-existent these days. Most magazines are morphing more and more into reviews that read like Facebook posts. Thank YOU.

    The only so called games I own, and have ever experienced (prior to getting TSW2) are Flight Simulators. Thankfully, they run like Simulators more so than games. I don't care about achievements or gaining level 10 or making points or winning anything. I care about operating the (in this case Train) and learning as much as I can about how it all works, using the best simulated systems available. The systems (train controls, yards, tracks, etc) in TSW2 seem ok but the game aspect of it is unbearable.

    I like what you said about Run8, and will check it out. MultiPlayer sounds interesting too. I know what that includes regarding Flight Sim. Cannot yet visualize what it means in Trains. Sounds fun.

    Thanks again for taking the time to be verbose and objective.

    --John
    You're welcome. I am a frustrated journalism graduate who's never worked in the biz, which might explain my game reviewer approach. Instead, I've worked a lot of customer servicey jobs, and one key to doing that well is understanding your customer's needs.

    If you are interested in Run8, there is a section here dedicated to it. If you want to check out the multiplayer, the two servers I've played on and can recommend are operated by Highball and TheDepot:

    www.highballrun8.com (their main server is more laid back)
    www.thedepotserver.com (their main server is the more prototypical "Depot+" where you must pass a check ride to operate. They have a more laid back "normal" server but when I was still playing, it was very quiet most of the time)

    Being a proper old-school sim, Run8 has a ton of extra content in terms of both routes expansions and rolling stock. I'd encourage a new player to stick with the default package and get used to it first. It's definitely not a sim for everyone, the controls and interface and such are not super-polished like in modern "games". Also, the default area (SW United States) has far and away the most content and the most players. We were bemoaning last week the fact that the New York and Florida add-on routes never got as much attention from people.

  9. #9

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    I'm going to add to the run8 info that metalangel has shared,being a run8 guy with over 960hours in my own sp session.
    this is bias as I love the run8. anyway unlike just about every other train sim, with run8
    In sp you can start a session then add or delete any rollingstock anywhere at any time and continue with out any special editor
    its all done whilst playing. So there is never really a canned scenario. You can pretty much sandbox any operating scenario you can imagine. You can also add or delete any interactive industry anywhere at anytime and set it to operate the way you want.
    Save game when ya had enuf, then p/u where you left off and it works every time all the time, My sp session is been going for 3 plus years
    As metalangel pointed out there's more routes for southwest But, run8 routes are continuous, meaning if you have Mojave sub then add cajon they connect you can then add the la route etc- so its possible to drive from fresno CA to Seligman in AZ. there's a video in the run8 section of this forum showing just that ,I think the drive was almost 12hrs.
    Yet another plus is that raildriver is native to run8 meaning plug and play. There are also separate dispatcher programs one free and on pay for which make dispatching ai easy and adds a bit of a challenge as well, I like it. these dispatcher panels can run on separate monitors as well.
    The one possible drawback is that you can't edit route or make a route it is strictly an operations/driving oriented sim, which is fine by me as that's my thing operations.
    here's a link to some informative videos on how it works
    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...xZVfP_ZnnmEXqO
    good luck in your next rr sim whichever you choose!
    The key is to find one that checks all the boxes for you.
    Last edited by ht-57; 12-16-2020 at 03:08 PM.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rebrecs View Post
    The only so called games I own, and have ever experienced (prior to getting TSW2) are Flight Simulators. Thankfully, they run like Simulators more so than games. I don't care about achievements or gaining level 10 or making points or winning anything. I care about operating the (in this case Train) and learning as much as I can about how it all works, using the best simulated systems available.
    --John
    If you are British/European, Rebrecs, then Run8 is purely American, and they have a different railway system to us, whereas the trains are operated by despatchers, which if you are not familiar with that term, then that may be a huge learning curve to begin with. I don't play the game personally, but, it has many highly praised reviews of it's operational objectives, the physics of the really long freight trains is sublime, and the North Americans love it, however, it is quite a costly exercise in obtaining the base game and the routes, locomotives, freightcars, etc, etc. If money is no object then it's up to you, but, I thought you'd like to know that all of these games need deep pockets from players to achieve a high level of entertainment, and when the Run8 routes are 40 dollars EACH plus the base game and other accessories, it's a big investment, especially, if you don't get along on with it after trying it out, you cannot get a refund, unfortunately, just be aware of the costs with all of these simulators, they soon mount up if you are not careful and you only have a small budget to spend.
    And of course quite a few of these games perform differently if you're using a desktop computer, or, a laptop, which affects things like framerates and graphics, etc, etc.

    Cheerz. Steve.
    i5 4690 3.5 GHz Quad Core CPU, Gigabyte Z97-HD3, 16GB RAM, nVidia GTX1060 6GB, WIN 7 PRO 64-bit.

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