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Thread: Looking for Graphics Card Suggestion

  1. #21
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    Yup a lot better after that update. Thanks for saving me many dollars!
    This is what this place is all about - Helping!

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Don6218 View Post
    Yup a lot better after that update. Thanks for saving me many dollars!
    This is what this place is all about - Helping!
    That's right mate I'm pleased my info was useful!!

    Cheers,
    Ged

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by slipperman View Post
    Hi Don,
    Sorry, I missed an important point in my last post

    Whichever replacement card you get, ensure that your existing Power Supply Unit (PSU) can supply the required power. According to NVIDIA data, the 645 requires a PSU rated at 450W, but it might be downrated by the original manufacturer. You need to check the label on your actual PSU. The 750 requires a 450W PSU together with an additional 6-pin power connector.

    Cheers,
    Ged
    Minor quibble: the GTX 750 and 750ti reference design, even with a slight overclock, will run completely within the power envelope of the PCIe bus. Unless the card maker was doing something funny, a 750 or ti should not require a separate 6-pin connector. Source: I have one (MSI "OC" (very slightly) 750ti, 2GB RAM). That said, I had a 450W PSU, and in my new computer (still using the 750ti due to scalper pricing on everything newer) have a 650W. 750s are still supported by current drivers, too. Crazy thing about the 750ti is that I bought it almost 10 years ago, for about $125, and a recent look for one (just for fun) at eBay turned up asking prices north of $150. As I say, scalper pricing.

    In a computer with an i5-10400F (6 core, 12 thread), 16GB RAM, SSD C: drive, Win10 Pro fully patched, and the 750ti with current driver, I see idle power consumption readings from my UPS monitoring software of 60-70W, total system including monitor, peaking around 90W with OR running. OR fps using Cajon Pass 4.1 in Explore mode, with fps limiting turned off, is over 300, which just managed to push total system consumption over 100W and bump up the fan speed a little. The previous computer had a Core2 Extreme X9650, 8GB RAM, SSD C: drive, Win10 Pro, and the 750ti with then-current drivers. Total system+LCD monitor power consumption was 90-110W idle, 140-150W with ORTS running Cajon Pass 4.1. OR fps with limits turned off, Cajon Pass 4.1 Explore mode, was about 90-120. The old computer, btw, had PCIe 2 slots, the current one is PCIe 3, and the 750ti is designed for PCIe 3. Also, the old one had SATA2 (3mbps) while the new one has SATA3 (6mbps). All of those improvements matter, and the GPU is now the bottleneck according to OR's Shift-F5 display. And the LCD monitor is only a few years old; with the 19" CRT monitor that I ran before, the old system pulled over 200W when active, idling around 175W. Intel didn't do power management as well in the old days.

    I guess I'd keep the old GPU going for a while, even in a new computer. It's probably good enough, if you remove all the other bottlenecks. And don't brush off the bottom of nVidia's line as you move up the generations - they're not bad if you're not into the most serious first-person shooters. OR will be happy with a 750, 750ti, 1050, or 1050ti, all of which can run entirely within PCIe power spec, and a 1650 (which can, barely, run from PCIe power alone) would be very good. Unfortunately, as noted, current pricing for even these out of production "bottom fishers" is out-of-sight ridiculous. Oh well.

  4. #24
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    Hi Mike,
    I bought my 750ti in 2014 for 116 GBP. It's an ASUS Dual Fan OC edition and does require a supplementary 6pin power connector.

    For a card with a "3 year limited warranty", I feel I've certainly had my money's worth! It's still running trouble-free, but I suppose I've said too much now and it'll fail in the next couple of days

    Cheers,
    Ged

  5. #25
    metalangel Guest

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    Keep your case, fans and heatsinks clean and free of dust and you'll dramatically increase the lifespan of your components. I take my laptop apart every few months and use an air duster to blow any dust and lint clear of the vents, as well as wipe around inside the fans with a Q-tip to get more out. A few times I've taken it further apart and pulled some serious wads of dust out from between the vent and the copper where it had gradually accumulated.

    If it's a hot day and I'm running something demanding, sometimes I shove a few low objects under the feet of my laptop to get more airflow underneath and into the intake vent. This laptop is likewise a 2014 vintage and has done better than I expected!

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by metalangel View Post
    Keep your case, fans and heatsinks clean and free of dust and you'll dramatically increase the lifespan of your components. I take my laptop apart every few months and use an air duster to blow any dust and lint clear of the vents, as well as wipe around inside the fans with a Q-tip to get more out. A few times I've taken it further apart and pulled some serious wads of dust out from between the vent and the copper where it had gradually accumulated.

    If it's a hot day and I'm running something demanding, sometimes I shove a few low objects under the feet of my laptop to get more airflow underneath and into the intake vent. This laptop is likewise a 2014 vintage and has done better than I expected!
    Absolutely, do this! I have to open up the desktop and clean it a couple of times a year - very dusty here. Even so, when I cleaned out the old parts in order to build the new computer, some of the more inaccessible corners had some serious dust bunnies in residence. Cleaning the main heat sink in the old computer was also kind of painful (very thin, sharp fins) and would get packed with dust that was hard to completely get out; the new one has things a little better spaced, and most important it's easy to remove the fan for cleaning access. Don't forget to clean the GPU heat sink too! And the power supply, especially if it's on the bottom of the case (as is common now) and sucks air in from under the box (you need a good filter, and I haven't seen one yet).

    My desktop is in a space where summer ambients are commonly between 80-85F. Heat sinks need to work well to keep CPU and GPU temps from climbing when OR is running.

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