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Thread: Employee timetables - Siding capacity

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
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    Germany
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    Question Employee timetables - Siding capacity

    When looking at old employee timetables I always see a column stating the capacity in cars for every siding on a subdivision.

    That got me wondering what the car lengths were used as a reference to get those numbers.

    Greetings
    Nico

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Minnesota
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    1,572

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    I think most of those timetables that listed capacity in cars were older, and were probably based on 40' cars, or maybe 50 in later cases. If you can find a track chart, those will usually give lengths in feet. Maybe I'll do that later...

    As an extreme example, DMIR's timetables used 25' cars for reference, since ore cars were the dominant life form

  3. #3

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    I compared a 1971 and 1994 timetable, and the math worked out between 45 and 50' so there's either some averaging at play or siding lengths were modified (likely) over a 25 year timeframe...

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
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    Some railroads do this with 50' boxcars as their reference. Though, now they just simply go by the total feet of the siding from clearance point to clearance point.

    I don't have the charts in front of me, but I think for an example, our longest siding is currently 2700', or 40 65' propane tanks...

    There are roads I've dealt with that have passing sidings up to 10k-15k feet in length. (signaled and non signaled territory.)
    https://i.imgur.com/LPZNEX4.png

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
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    St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada.
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    You could always find a siding that still exists. I know some siding lengths have changed so this is not always possible. Then head into Google Earth once you have a length from one side to the other at the non fouling point (Usually at the end of the curve off the switch. Take your length and divide it by the number of cars in the old timetable. It really depends what your trying to look for be it for simulation purposes etc. I know some sidings are very difficult to measure as they've changed over the years. If you luck there is historical images in your area that you can use as well.

    Thanks

    Sean

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