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Thread: Where's Goku?

  1. #11

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    When I worked with Piotr a few years ago to get the build of TRSE to work I had trouble getting Qt to build but eventually got it to work after setting some paths.

    Add these paths to your system environmental variable PATH:

    C:\yourMinGW\msys\1.0\bin;
    C:\yourMinGW\bin;
    C:\yourMinGW\opt\bin;

    replace yourMinGW with proper path

    If your path to qmake looks like this then it is ok:
    C:\Qt\Static\5.7.0\bin\qmake.exe

    If you have everything installed:

    1. Open Netbeans.
    2. Click "Team->Git->Clone"
    3. Enter repository adress: https://bitbucket.org/GokuMK/tsre5 and
    your login and password for bitbucket
    4. Next, ok ...
    5. Enjoy playing with source code!

    To build app you will probably need to edit configuration.
    1. Right click on TSRE5 -> Properties
    2. Build -> Manage Configuration -> select Release and click "set
    active" button and press ok.
    3. In Tool collection you should have MinGW_QT_5.7.0_Static. If you
    don't have, click the [...] and make new like this:

    GNU MinGW paths.jpg

    Click "Build Project" button.

    If you downloaded and installed Netbeans, download required tools and libs:

    http://koniec.org/tsre5/tools/

    1.
    5.7.0 is static build of QT 5.7.0. Download and extract to
    C:/QT/Static/
    It has to be this path because it is hardcoded during compilation. If
    you want put it somewhere else, you must build your own QT from
    sources.

    2.
    MinGW is g++ compiler and gnu tools. Download and extract. Best in:
    C:/
    But if you must, you can put it in other place.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    New York, USA.
    Posts
    2,222

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alexhill View Post
    When I worked with Piotr a few years ago to get the build of TRSE to work I had trouble getting Qt to build but eventually got it to work after setting some path.
    Hi Folks,

    Now THAT's what I'm talk'n about - perhaps a little teamwork will get some improvements off the ground.


    Regards,
    Scott

  3. #13

    Default

    I might give that a try one of these days, if for no other reason to remove the limit on static detail level Goku promised in the next version, which never came.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Silicon Valley, CA, USA.
    Posts
    3,434

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by eolesen View Post
    I might give that a try one of these days, if for no other reason to remove the limit on static detail level Goku promised in the next version, which never came.

    Oh PLEASE!
    Dave Nelson

    Seldom visiting, posting less often that that.

  5. #15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by eolesen View Post
    I might give that a try one of these days, if for no other reason to remove the limit on static detail level Goku promised in the next version, which never came.
    If you're really looking into it, perhaps also the 999m limit on auto-placement?

    Would make it much easier placing milepost markers

  6. #16

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    Nope. That limit is there because of the math involved and limiting placement to adjoining tiles only.

    Sent from my SM-G981U using Tapatalk

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 1999
    Location
    Jacksonville,, FL, USA.
    Posts
    3,986

    Default

    I haven't looked at the source code and rarely use TSRE anyway, but that is probably going to be a "forced change" soon.
    I still use Win-7 because I have a ATI Radeon video card and it is almost impossible to get an Nvidia card these days at
    any price, I guess account of the chip issue we all read about. To go to Win-10 would require an Nvidia card to run
    MSTS, and Win-11 has just been relelased, so we do not yet know what horrors we will have to deal with to use MSTS
    "DATA" if not the MSTS program itself, on Win-11. I have no intention of going that way until it has been out a while
    and the most glaring problems corrected - as is the case with any new operating system.

    I used to be able to decipher "C" or "Visual C" but that is not the problem. To compile a program from source code
    you must have a compiler and those can be pricey. Then the creator probably used some kind of script file to tell
    the compiler how to handle this or that, and that is where the going gets tough. I hope Goku is okay and while I
    don't use the program much, I find it is the absolute best there is for aligning objects to the track or a road.

    J. H. Sullivan

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Lubec ME USA
    Posts
    557

    Default

    I used to be able to decipher "C" or "Visual C" but that is not the problem. To compile a program from source code
    you must have a compiler and those can be pricey.
    Actually for C++ or Java there are free compilers available, as well as frameworks for program development (IDE) such as Eclipse.
    https://gcc.gnu.org/
    https://www.eclipse.org/downloads/

    I used Eclipse as a C++ and Java developer, it is the standard IDE for developers.

    C# as used by Open Rails is another issue as it is proprietary to Microsoft but I believe there are inexpensive options there for casual developers. I have never used it myself so I have not looked into it.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Worksop, UK
    Posts
    2,433

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    Hi jonpd,
    The development environment for C# is Microsoft's Visual Studio Express, which also supports C++.
    This is free, although registration with Microsoft is required, and all my utilities have been written in that language.

    It has now been replaced by Visual Studio Community which, also, is free, but I've not tried it yet!

    Cheers,
    Ged

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Lubec ME USA
    Posts
    557

    Default

    Hi Ged,
    I will have to try C# sometime. As I understand it, it is somewhat similar to Java, having been developed by Microsoft due to the fact that Java itself is proprietary to Oracle and its predecessors and they wanted to do something a little different as they tried to do with J++ but ran into problems due to non compliance with the Java standard. I spent the last 16 years of my career programming in Java which I am comfortable with but it has its idiosyncrasies e.g. how I/O is handled.

    Jon

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